Feminist Declares Woman as Sacred, Not Subordinate Notes on Gender, Relationships and Key Areas Where Problems Exist

Feminist Declares Woman as Sacred, Not Subordinate
Notes on Gender, Relationships and Key Areas Where Problems Exist

By Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

It cannot be argued whether or not women are a subordinate to men or even a “female slave” as some have been told may have been women’s original status.  It cannot be argued, whether or not race has hierarchy, in the same light as women having hierarchy cannot be argued.  In order to march forward, a new platform needs to be established with empirical research that pertains to the role of women.

There are several key points I want to make to establish the role of women as positive-both to elicit a positive outcome and to suggest that women are in fact held in high regard.  The first point has to do with the identification of females around the home and key protagonists in the visible image of women.

It can be concluded that at this specific residence, there existed many examples of women that were derived from manufacturer’s product or artist’s art works.  It can be concluded that the image of women may be tied to the perceptions of women in those fields of manufacturing and art which were overwhelmingly positive and flattering to women.

The images that were analyzed were:  an image of “Kali” a multi armed women that was gilded in gold with gold coins spilling from her lap, surrounded by elephants and sitting in a lotus, a “Nativity Set” that featured Mary and Infant Jesus in a manger with lamb and Three Wise Men,  A Virgin Guadalupe Candle where it was inscribed on the back to “help all those in need,”  a woman and man image where the woman is playing flute in front of a peacock with two love birds and a crowned man wears a peacock feather in his headdress (both wear wedding rings), images of women on fabric patterns, images of women in the store circulars, a DuMouchelle Auction House Advertising that featured a women cast in marble with a pensive look wearing a draped skirt and shirt falling off her shoulders,  an etching in dry point and aquatint of a woman with her dress thrust behind her wearing stockings below and ruffled knickers, an urn with Elizabethan images, on a folder was a female appearance in the image of a Unicorn, The Morton Salt Girl, Sun Maid Raisins, Blue Bonnet Margarine, La Preferida Long Grain Rice, Kama Sutra Playing Cards, Tarot Cards, an Indian Tapestry of a Bride pulled by a camel, a harem scene that included one King and Five Brides spraying perfume on each other, Two Princesses with Gold Crowns playing flute.

Women appeared from this selection to be hard working, physically beautiful, sensual, even having fantasy, there was a double entendre of “Sun Maid” where women could appear the maid to her son or  or a cleaning person or born of the son (the father, the son and the holy ghost) perhaps biblical or a maiden harvesting fruits.

The Morton Salt Girl was also interesting to decode.  On the Morton Salt packaging there was a young girl in a mini dress with delicate legs walking under an umbrella in the rain while pouring salt behind her.  The image is beautiful and is further associated to the root “mort” which could refer to death or embalming or religious practice.  The Morton Salt Girl may be something biblical.  Salt in the bible means death when one dries or things crisp.  The young Morton Salt Girl may stand for life and the package may reflect life to death or from a young fecund virgin or from birth until death.   The Morton Salt Girl, I am told refers to a specific passage in the bible.

There were two images where women played flute that portray women as having a delicate voice.  The age range of the women portrayed in this particular house was diverse some gray haired Elizabethan’s and other young and fecund.  I found most if not all the images of women in this particular research to be sacred, held often as an object of worship and in a religious light. I conclude that the image of women in this study held women in a spiritual light that was consistently fantastical, iconic and sacred.

The key points had to do with the roles of women in imagery and the key protagonists plus the platform desire to initiate “positive advertising.”   Positive Advertising may involve media, product range, art or campaigns.  Positive Advertising creates a momentum for women; that is both positive and enduring.   This author aims to cast away the prevailing sentiment of women as a subordinate, oppressed or downtrodden and maintain her in a regal light, high upon a pedestal and sublime.  Women can begin to select their “bars.”

References

Cudd, Ann E. & Andreasen, Robin O., Feminist Theory:  A Philosophical Anthology, Blackwell Publishing, 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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