How are the Human Brain and Computers Alike?

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

The human brain and the computer may derive their information and knowledge in different ways –today-but both share cognitive function and are mostly “thinking beings.” According to the Turing Test, which made a distinction between the “imitation of thinking” and true thinking in computers.[1]  Many technological issues, even rights issues, in the future, may involve basic ideas around being “thinking beings.”

A computers knowledge may be derived from artificial intelligence where as a humans, atleast recently, derived  some of their knowledge from learning and somewhat from genetic make-up.

There are many cases where humans have desired a smarter computer, followed by a smarter self, more computer synthesized, which was evident in the millennial popularity of becoming a cyborg and chipping oneself here and there.

Computers may also begin to share more and more human capacity such as with cars developed with super computers and artificial intelligence that may serve as future drivers. One such autonomous vehicle  or computer was able to drive from Erie to Pittsburg without accidents, 200 miles.[2]  In the future things that computers may do that make them more human like may be drive, go to school and learn/study/teach/write/publish, or possess a more defined psychological computation, as was a prior goal of scientists researching artificial intelligence.[3]

Computers and beings have distinct storage, manipulation and sharing-however one scholar said “the likenesses equal the differences.”[4]  If one were to draw a line down the center of a piece of paper and compare humans and computers, in many slots there may not exist an exact counterpart, but a counterpart.  A human brain may have “ a compact tissue of nerve cells, fibers and signals, mobilized neurons with a fundamental relationship with anatomy and function”;[5]a computer may have a central processing unit, motherboard, memory, chip set, cache, ROM, RAM, virtual memory, monitor, keyboard and mouse.[6]  Other things humans are said to have according to  the book “Mind, Brain and Behavior” are “organs, areas, cognitive modules, functional maps, which jointly constitute a workspace.”[7]  Humans may differ from computers in terms of sensory perception, feelings and emotion, but not entirely, many computers also share those attributes.[8]

Many humans felt too status quo within their being and preferred a cyber orientation and perhaps wanted to leave “human” behind and become a machine.  Conversely, it has been desired for computers-full human intelligence. [9]

Some humans have desired a greater human-machine interface and to become “an object for designing.” In Cohen’s film, “Man and The Machine,” it was as if humans were phasing out.

[1] CROCKETT, L. The Turing Test and the Frame Problem : AI’s Mistaken Understanding of Intelligence. Norwood, N.J. : Intellect Books, 1994. (Ablex Series in Artificial Intelligence). ISBN: 9781567500301, Pg. 2

[2][2] Film:  Technoscience, Blurring the Lines Between Man and The Machine, by Lewis Cohen

[3] CROCKETT, L. The Turing Test and the Frame Problem : AI’s Mistaken Understanding of Intelligence. Norwood, N.J. : Intellect Books, 1994. (Ablex Series in Artificial Intelligence). ISBN: 9781567500301, Pg 1.

[4] Quote taken from Sasha Suvorkov said in conversation, unsure of originator.

[5] Changeux, Jean-Pierre. Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative Ser. : L’ Homme de Vérité : Neuroscience and Human Knowledge. Cambridge, US: Harvard University Press, 2009. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 29 January 2017.

[6] McKeogh, Cathy, Understanding The Personal Computer, Darnley Publishing Group, 2016, pg, iv-v

[7] Changeux, Jean-Pierre. Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative Ser. : L’ Homme de Vérité : Neuroscience and Human Knowledge. Cambridge, US: Harvard University Press, 2009. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 29 January 2017. Pg. 13

[8] Changeux, Jean-Pierre. Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative Ser. : L’ Homme de Vérité : Neuroscience and Human Knowledge. Cambridge, US: Harvard University Press, 2009. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 29 January 2017. Pg.13

[9] CROCKETT, L. The Turing Test and the Frame Problem : AI’s Mistaken Understanding of Intelligence. Norwood, N.J. : Intellect Books, 1994. (Ablex Series in Artificial Intelligence). ISBN: 9781567500301, Pg 1.

 

 

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