Mathematics and Natural Language

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

There was once a technical writing class that gave the assignment to take a specific piece of conversation and write next to every line either “warrant” or “claim.”[1] It was as if all conversation were shaped by this basic “volley” and formula.

Life is perhaps rooted in this method where one offers supports, proofs and eventually warrants a claim, to build a basic conversation. Daily conversation is similar to the process of “justified true belief” in the epistemic pursuit of knowledge-people go about making claims and offering proof within regular conversation.

In the book “Mathematics of Language,” language descriptions are made in regards to the use of “known algorithms that parse ‘context free language’ (CFL’s) in cubic time or less.”[2] Apparently, there are “math models that are especially suited to the natural languages.”[3]

Logic from mathematics may be the foundation of natural language. Logic may be what lies right below our conversation.

“The natural languages are the familiar class of the formal languages that were also described as the input evidence available to children and learnable.”[4]

When looking at the foundations of mathematics there were parallels made about mathematics and Platonism, Formalism, Logicism, Constructivism and Geometrical perspectives.  [5]

The book Mathematics and the Natural Sciences highlighted “analyses of human cognition,” philosophy of knowledge and mathematics impact or service to highly “mathematized” physics and biology.[6]

The following describes “Mathematics has “rational coherence,” deals with “matter” and “of life,” “living” and “inert,” is reducible, has phenomenalities, -simultaneous measurement, position and momentum, physical time and space via living phenomena.”

Mathematics has cognitive foundations such as those in logic.

Footnotes

[1] Eastern Michigan University, Professor Benninghoff, Technical Writing

[2] Mathematics of Language: Proceedings of a conference held at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, October 1984, Contributor, Manaster-Ramer, Alexis, John Benjamins Publishing Company, January 1987, pg. 3

[3] Mathematics of Language: Proceedings of a conference held at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, October 1984, Contributor, Manaster-Ramer, Alexis, John Benjamins Publishing Company, January 1987, pg. 1

[4] Mathematics of Language: Proceedings of a conference held at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, October 1984, Contributor, Manaster-Ramer, Alexis, John Benjamins Publishing Company, January 1987, pg. 1

[5] Longo, Giuseppe. ADVANCES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: TEXTS : MATHEMATICS AND THE NATURAL SCIENCES : The Physical Singularity of Life. River Edge, US: Imperial College Press, 2011. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 7 February 2017. Pg. v

[6] Longo, Giuseppe. ADVANCES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: TEXTS : MATHEMATICS AND THE NATURAL SCIENCES : The Physical Singularity of Life. River Edge, US: Imperial College Press, 2011, pg. vii

[7] Longo, Giuseppe. ADVANCES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: TEXTS : MATHEMATICS AND THE NATURAL SCIENCES : The Physical Singularity of Life. River Edge, US: Imperial College Press, 2011, pg. viii

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