Culinary Book List #2

Culinary Book List #2

Compiled By Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

German Cook Book

German Pastries

Ethiopian Cook Book

Cook 90 David Tamarkin

The Broad Fork by Hugh Acheson

Bobby Plays Bar Americain Cook Book  By Bobby Flay w/Stephanie Banyas

Joy of Mixology $30

Maldon Salt Bucket $29 Amazon

Silver Palatte Cookbook

Ethiopian Cook book with Bread

Mourad: New Moroccan

King Arthur Flour

 

Mexicanplease.com

Thespruceeats.com

Thegourmetgourmand.com

www.mylatinatable.com

 

 

Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat   Samin Nosrat

Flavors of Africa  Evi Aki

Dishing up Dirt, simple Recipes for Cooking Through The Seasons  Andrea Bevis

Fair Foods  George Geary

Princess Pamelas Soul Food Cook Book of Afro-American Recipes  Pamela Strobel

America’s Test Kitchen

Better Homes and Gardens 100 Recipes You’ll Make Forever

A Taste of Latin America Patricia Cartin

Melba American Comfort Foods   Melba Wilson

Mario Batali Big American Cook Book   Mario Batali

Deep Run Roots Vivian Howard

Melissa’s Southern Cook Book   Melissa Sperky

The Hungry Fan’s Game Day Cook Book   Daina Falk

Sweetie Pies Cook Book  Robbie Montgomery

The Best American Recipes Fran McCullough

Food & Wine Annual Cook Book  Kate Heddings

The Peach Truck Cook Book  Jessica Rose

Ruffage A Practical Guide to Vegetables

Indianish Recipes & Antics From a Modern American Family  Priya Krishna

Magnolia Table A Collection of Recipes for Gathering   Joanna Gaines

How To Taste     Becky Selengut

The Family Table Living Nomadic   Smollett-Warwell, Jazz

Feast Food of the Islamic World, Helon, Anissa

Soul, A Chefs Culinary Evolution in 150 Recipes

American Cookie   Anne Byrn

Sweet Home Café Cook Book A Celebration of American Cooking   Albert Lukas

Bring it, Tried and True Recipes for Potlucks and Casual Entertaining, Ali Rosen

Home Front Cooking  Tracey Enerson Wood

Cooks Illustrated Revolutionary Recipes America’s Test Kitchen

Chinese Heritage Cooking From My American Kitchen  Shirley Cheng

Garden to Table Fresh Recipes From Williams and Sonoma Test Kitchen Nicole Hill Gerulat

African American Heritage Cook Book

Southern Living

Family of the Spirit Cook Book

Cooking The North African Way  Mary Winget

Cooking The West African Way Bertha Vining Montgomery

Cooking The East African Way  Bertha Montgomery

 

Gari w/Sardines or Adapt to Husky Recipe

Gari w/Sardines or Adapt to Husky Recipe

1 box of Cream of Wheat with individual packages
1 can Titus Sardines, hot or regular
¼ cup chopped tomato
¼ cup chopped onion
1 Bottle Sriracha

Directions:
In a small pot on the stove, measure out Cream of Wheat Farina packet with its specified water and a dash of salt. Normally each packet takes 2/3 cup of water. Let that form into a thin gruel on a high heat and cook completely, then slowly add a second packet without its water to the gruel to thicken or it until it’s stiff and manageable with the hands. Place on plate in a mound. Use two packets and 2/3 cup water to make one serving.
Open one can of Titus, carefully open each sardine at their slit and remove skeleton all at once in fish. Run your finger down fish body to make sure all bones are removed. Place on plate sardine broken into pieces.
Chop tomato, chop onion, and then place on plate. End with a few squirts of Sriracha Sauce a tomato based red pepper sauce also placed on the plate.
Place them so you go from Cream of Wheat, to fish, to onion, to tomato to Sriracha-in order of operations for a nice taste.
Gari is a simple dish that you pull with your hands (right) from each pile and consume from your hands.
You can recreate the same dish but “Husky” by changing Farina for corn meal masa like Mexican Masa used for tamales placed in corn husks tied then in a large pot place a steamer basket and water on bottom and then place Husky on top in husks and steam for 45 minutes.
Eat the same.
Gari can additionally be paired with corned beef cooked. Corned beef that in left over is also nice mixed into rice with onion and green pepper.

Recipe by Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Mackerel in Tomato Sauce with Boiled Egg and Fried Plantain

Mackerel in Tomato Sauce with Boiled Egg and Fried Plantain
Sauce

1 can Mackerel in Chili Sauce (From an African Grocery Geisha Brand)
1 can Crushed Tomatoes large
1 can Black eyed peas
1 large onion chopped
1 Green pepper chopped
3 tbsp. Palm Oil
3 tbsp. Vegetable Oil
1.5 Nina International Ground Hot Pepper Chiles
2 tbsp. Salt
½ tsp. Ginger minced
½ tsp. Garlic minced small

Rice (Valley Brand is good)
Boiled Egg, whole and peeled
Ripe Plantain
Vegetable oil

Remove fish from can onto a plate, open each piece and slide off the boney skeleton, remove all bones. Rub hand or finger over fish to make sure bones were removed for safety. Break fish into small pieces Put on a pot of rice (2 parts water to one part rice dash of salt and 1 tsp oil). Put on a small pot of water and boil an egg or eggs depending on # of people (1 per person) for later garnish. Chop all vegetables and assemble sauce. Sautee vegetables in palm oil & veg oil (onions, garlic, ginger, green pepper), add fish, add black eyed peas, add stewed tomato and add spices. Cook down. In a separate skillet heat veg. oil. Chop Plantain into wheels and fry, turning once. Cook all ~20 minutes. Rice finishes in about 15 minutes. Everything should start to wrap up in 15-20 min. Place rice on plate, spoon Mackerel over top. Place a boiled egg in center of mackerel and plantain around egg on top of Mackerel sauce and serve hot. Serves 4. By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu passed on from Father (Kasoa Market)

Nkotombmre, A Basic “Wield” of Ghanaian and West African Culinary- Greens, Fish and Tomato

 

Nkotombmre
A Basic Wield of Ghanaian and West African Culinary: Greens, Fish and Tomato
By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

A basic “wield” of West African cooking may have the same simple ingredients in many different combinations: it may include greens, peanut sauce, tomato and chicken, or greens, fish and tomato, or peanut stew with mushroom and chicken, or black eyed peas, fish, and tomato.

Most are stewed with and cooked in palm oil or coconut oil or vegetable oil with African Red Pepper Chili (Nina International Brand) and include garlic and ginger, onion and green pepper and sometimes magi cubes or blended up and liquefied onions, or blended up garlic, ginger and tomato with plantain dipped inside to make “Kelewele” or sometimes coconut milk, broth, or okra, or fried okra, or add spoonful’s of peanut butter or as a side blended up eggplant or hummus-these are some basic West African (and around) or Ghanaian cooking.  You can get experimental with interesting chili peppers or a variety of mushrooms in stews or add plantains to stew to make it a little fancier or haughty.  Some cooks will thicken a stew with Tahina or coconut milk or the liquefied onions or broths.

A basic idea is to blend and liquefy vegetables etc., succulence, and dipping.  Also it’s flavored oils, tender meats and a little heat. Other common things are fresh fruit, fruit salads, fresh bread, kebabs and satays.  Also common are rice dishes or rice and vegetables like “Joloff Rice” that includes mixed vegetables or dill rice or little savory dishes or cabbage dishes.

Alot of Africans like tender and spicy jerk chicken or coconut shrimp or meat pies or fried chicken or chicken wings (even marmalade wings or teriyaki wings)or  curries or Ethiopian Berbere Stews or even Chinese Stir Fry’s or Spaghetti Bakes. Some African’s will go to a fish market or meat market and just want “a nice piece of meat” and some rice, plantain and salad etc.  Some even like gravy’s and sauces.  One African may like salads with boiled egg, sausage, tomato topped with Thousand Island Dressing.  Some Africans like other cultural dishes that include a peanut taste like Vietnamese dishes with crushed peanuts or Thai, Pad Thai noodles in peanut sauce.  Africans may also like “Bright Chicken,” which is a lemon based pan fried chicken and has marvelous flavor.  Some may also like grilling or popping a piece of fish into foils with herbs and lemon into the oven wrapped up in a packet. Some African cooking has alot of French or Francophone influences from common shared languages and cultural taste buds.  Dishes like Coq au vin or an aperitif or a cheese and fruit platter dessert may be popular.

Many meats can be tenderized and sautéed in coconut oil and eaten with rice and a salad or a vegetable or a pot of pickled greens. Many dishes can be topped with fried plantain and or a boiled egg on top or a boiled egg in bowls of stew to be sexy or macho. Most also include plantain fried, baked or boiled, yellow or green (green and unripe is often boiled) or cocoyam boiled, or yam tubers skinned and boiled.

Most also include some kind of doughy manioc like Fu Fu (pounded yam, often sold in flours), Gari (sometimes a Cream of Wheat or Farina stiffened with more of itself and less water), Kenkey or corn meal “Husky” (like Mexican masa cooked)(Kenkey without the Kenk or fermentation), rice or rice balls, or yam or plantain-as the starch accompaniment.

The other staple are stews or soups that go with starches. Stews are “cut meat” stews where large chunks or cubes are cut by a butcher on a band saw of either fish, chicken, goat or beef or lamb. There is an art to the cutting of the meat and the succulence of the stew later. Sometimes you can cut chicken with a cleaver. Try Kasoa Market in Ann Arbor, Michigan for good “cut meats,” for stews.

Kasoa Market also carries the staples of Titus Sardines which are good with a stiffened Cream of Wheat, Sriracha Sauce, chopped onions and diced tomatoes and sometimes also cooked corned beef-this is simply called “Gari.” Gari is served on a plate or platter all together in order of eating operations. Most dishes are eaten with the right hand, sometimes dipping into each item.  Ghanaian’s have that dipping quality je ne sais quoi, like in the game with seeds and bowls “Oware,” almost like the letter “U.” Husky can be eaten the same way as Gari.  The leftover corned beef can be mixed with cooked rice, onions and green pepper for another delicious dish.

Nkotombmre-is cooked down and blended chopped spinach or another green, broken up pieces of fish (mostly canned, marinated or pickled fish) Geisha Brand Mackerel in Chili Sauce or Titus Sardines and fresh or stewed tomatoes with African chili pepper and salt, cooked in palm oil. Let it all break down until it is one interesting blended green sauce that you eat over something or dip into with an accompaniment, even crackers or warmed or toasted bread.  Nkotombmre is really tasty with fried plantain logs or boiled green plantains for example.   It looks almost like Chimichurri which may have originated in Ethiopia and is around the world? It can be found in Mexico and Argentina via the Italians in Ethiopia that later immigrated to Argentina and it became their food, then from the Argentine’s presumably to Mexico etc. Chimichurri is ladled over meats, mostly beef, and is parsley, olive oil, red wine vinegar, cilantro, garlic, red pepper, cumin and salt all blended into a green sauce.

Many dishes could just be eaten with crackers like the Mackerel in Chili Sauce or the Nkotombmre, or Chimichurri can be ladled over meats and things.  Some dishes you can take a bowl of rice turn it upside down in another larger bowl and pour soup over then lift off bowl to leave a round mound or an island with stew around or have a Fu Fu island in stew bowl or just a boiled egg and meats in stew.  You can dress a stew in many ways.

Good drinks to have are ones like: Fanta, Bitter Lemon, Pampelmousse Grapefruit Drink, Palm Wine, Ting, Star Beer or African Guinness. With all the chili you may just want water!!! Fire! Fire! Fire!  West African’s also typically drink lemon grass tea.  They use fresh stalks of lemon grass and cut off pieces and steep them in hot water for a delicious and memorable tea.  Some Africans really enjoy mulled herb teas or Black tea’s or Gunpowder Green Tea. There are also excellent South African wines like Chamonix or Simeon and many others.  African’s also enjoy Peak Milk with Nescafe Coffee and even cakes iced with Nescafe icing.  You can also just mix condensed milks as often do the Thai with coffee, a few tablespoons, for a delicious hot drink.

Ghanaian’s love “tea and biscuits” and are somewhat influenced heavily by the English. Other dishes common in England like baked beans on toast one may find also in Ghana. A Ghanaian father in America may feed to his young children, baked beans with hotdogs cut up in them-“beans and franks.”  A plate of Gari may be shared by a father and his children as one plate.  A dessert for a child may be simply baked plantains with peanut butter.

Africa was designated a more rural locale due to the presence of large game animals and game reserves. Perhaps it was more savior faire that desired land and rural, mixed with animals and cities. This represents a more simple “rural African diet.”  As Africa advances and becomes more cosmopolitan, so will Africa’s culinary augment and grow with all the old favorites.

Then pop in some music like: Franco, or Thomas Mapfumo, or Ali Farka Toure or Amadou and Mariam, Orchestra Baobab, Miriam Makeba (Love Tastes Like Strawberries), Salif Keita, Baaba Maal, Babatunde, Fela Kuti, Buika, Caetano Veloso, Cesaria Evora, Dar es Salaam Jazz Band, Femi Kuti, Ibrahim Ferrer, Peru Negro, Sam Mangwana, Youssou N’Dour, Angleique Kidjo, Zap Mama, Soukous.

 

 

A French African Game “Changez Vous”

A French African Game “Changez Vous”
The rules:
Sing in French passionately, guttural, gritty or drunken and dramatic, preferably a lamentation:

Changez
Changez
Changez vous

Sing first the chorus or beginning and “ad lib” the rest of the song spontaneously in French. You may write or practice ahead of time with dictionaries or translations etc. You may hold a paper to read from as you sing in French.

Best done on holidays or gatherings or in French classes or by fireside or when drinking wine or when channeling the French or feeling like a little parlez vous Francais or if you are Francophone a passionate lamentation about your love, or past loves or life.

Good examples are topics like from the monster of last year or change into her mother and my lover, or yesterday Serwah today Pomme Frites or the winter for the spring etc.

Make it a love song, make it the next Jacques Brel, become a French Torch or night club singer. You can be tragic or melancholy or forlorn or in love or write wedding vows.

It’s a nice “pocket game” that is fun for all occasions, ages and just in time for the holidays. A good excuse to buy a bottle of French wine or any good drink will do it! If you’re a child, try grape juice to simulate a drunken French disgruntled lover-and don’t get any grape juice on the carpet!

Enjoy!

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Stay tuned for forthcoming book “Pocket Games” by Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Up to Snuff #50: Winter Reading List 2018 with emphasis on African Writers

Up to Snuff #50:  Winter Reading List 2018 with emphasis on African Writers

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Put together a box of books, cover your coffee table with books,  light a fire or head to a cottage or good “reading city” and read, read, read and maybe practice piano, throw in a few page turners, some classics and what I call “kb” or knowledge based books, stash articles, research a nice PHD read, check for Nobel Laureates in Literature and don’t forget to take your child to the library once a week to satisfy a young readers consumption, maybe 2 books a night, maybe even take a book run vacation and collect foreign language books to build a linguistics profile, buy or build some book shelves and build your families library, read, read, read.   A good hobby to have is researching books or getting good classes with good book lists or go to a school with a good library or asking colleagues for a book list, read, read, read.

 

Sommerset Maugham –all books

Tolstoy

Nikolai Gogol

D.H. Lawrence

Daphne Du Maurier

Jane Eyre

Nathanial Hawthorne

Alice Walker

Euripides

Bulwark

Falun Gong

Find some good Latin books

Spanish novels or newspapers or little pamphlets

Try to read/earn a few skills

Read across an area all you can get your hands on or a writers complete collection

Carlos Casteneda

T.S. Elliot

Aga Kahn

Prentice Hall books (Publisher)

Gandhi

James Baldwin

Jose Saramago

Breton

Satre

E.O. Wilson

Oscar Wilde

Read Recipes

Fareed Zakaria

Pablo Neruda

Octavio Paz

Rosario Castellanos

Paul Ricoeur

Confucius

Aleksandr Dugin

Jurgen Habermas

Nick Land Alt Right

Bill Gates

Complete Guide to Sewing, Readers Digest 1995

Designing Apparel Through Flat Pattern Fifth Edition, Fairchild Publications

How to Draft Basic Flat Patterns, Fairchild Publications

Ross, B.H., This is Like That:  The Use of Earlier Problems and the Separation of Similarity Effects.  Journal of Experimental Psychology:  Learning, Memory and Cognition

Schank, R.C., Tell Me a Story:  Narrative and Intelligence, Evanston, Ill, Northwestern University Press

Schank, R.C., & Abelson R., Scripts, Plans, Goals and Understanding:  An Inquiry into Human Knowledge Structures, Hillsdale, NJ, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

Spiro, R.J., Coulson, R.L., Feltvich, P.J., & Anderson, D.K (1988) Cognitive Flexibility Theory:  Advanced Knowledge Acquisition in Ill Structured Domains, Tech Report No 441, Champaign, Ill:  University of Illinois

Center for the Study of Reading, Sternberg, R. J., & French, P.A. (Eds.) (1991) Complex Problem Solving:  Principles and Mechanisms, Hillsdale, NJ, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

Voss, J.F & Post, T. A. (1988), On solving of Ill Structured Problems, IN M. T.. H Chi, R, Glaser, & M.J. Farr (Eds.), The Nature of Expertise (PP. 261-185), Hillsdale, NJ:  Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 

The Complete Greek Tragedies

MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing

Writing Your Dissertation In Fifteen Minutes a Day:  A Guide to Starting, revising and finishing your doctoral thesis/Joan Bolker

Sicily by Katie and Giancarlo Caldesi

The Italian Baker by Melissa Forti and Danny Bernardini

Mozza at Home by Nancy Silverton and Carolyn CArreno

Henry and June

Tropic of Cancer

Cities of The Interior, Anais Nin

Balzac

The Rhinoceros  by, Ionesco

A good almanac

Collect Maps and study them

 

 

Some African Writers

Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Peter Abrahams, Mine boy, This Island Now, A Wreath for Udomo ( South Africa)

Chinua Achebe (Nigeria)

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Jose Eduardo Agualusa

Mohamed Naseehu Ali (Ghana)

Germano Almeida

Elechi Amadi

Ayi Kwei Armah (Ghana)

Sefi Atta

Ayesha Harruna Attah

Mariama BA

Nadifa Mohamed

Chris Barnard

Mongo Beti

Andre Brink

J.M Coetzee

Mia Couto

Tsitsi Dangarembga

Mohammed Dib

E.K.M. dido

Assia Djebar

  1. Sello Duiker

Daphne Williams

Buchi Emecheta

Daniel Olorunfemi Fagunwa

Nuruddin Farah

Athol Fugard

Nadine Gordimer

Alex La Guma

Bessie Head

Moses Isegawa

Rayda Jacobs

Tahar Ben Jellouon

Cheikh Hamidou Kane

Yasmina Khadra

Camara Laye

Naguib Mahfouz

Charles Mangua

Sarah Ladipo Manyika

Dambudzo  Marechera

Darlene mattee

Zakes Mda

Thomas Mofolo

Bai Tamia Moore

Meja Mwangi

Ngugi wa Thiong’o

Lewis Nkosi

Flora Nwapa

Nnedi Okorafor

Ben Okri

Deon Opperman

Yambo Ouologuem

Alan Paton

Pepetela

Sol Plaatje

Nawal El Saadawi

Tayeb Salih

Wilton Sankawulo

Karel Schoeman

Olive Schreiner

Benjamin Sehene

Ousmane Sembene

Wole, Soyinka

Amos Tutuola

Marlene van Niekirk

Yvonnne Vera

Jose Luandino Vieira

Joseph Jeffrey Walters

Birhanu Zerihun

Ama Ata Aidoo

Georges Andriamanantena

Jared Angira

Kofi Anyidoho

Kofi Awooner

Sahesillasse Birhanemariam

Breyten Breytenbach

Dennis Brutus

Glynn Burridge

Abena Busia

John Pepper Clark

Jose Craveirinha

Viriato Clemenete da Cruz

Getinet Eniyew

Tsegaye Gebremedhin

Abbe Gubenga

Hadraawi

Ingrid Jonker

Jonathan Kariara

Joseph Kariuki

Susan Kiguli

Ahmadou Kourouma

Antjie Krog

Jack Mapanje

Eugene Mapanje

Eugene Marais

Don Mattera

Bai Tamia Moore

Togara Muzanenhamo

  1. Moses Nagbe

Arthur Nortje

Gabriel Okara

Nii Parkes

Chrisotpher Okigbo

Okot P’Bitek

Lenrie Peters

Jean-Joseph Rabearivelo

Jacques Rabemananjara

Elie Rajaonarison

Ny Avana Ramanantoanina

Pierre Randrianarisoa

Jean Verdi Saloman Razakandraina

David Rubadiri

Tijan Sallah

Leopold Sedar Senghor

Debede Seyfu

Bewketu Seyoum

Warsan Shire

Adam Small

Veronique Tadjo

Dagnachew WERku

Armenio Vieira

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley

 

 

Credit:  Wikipedia African Writers List (see for more detailed list)

 

 

 

Just Released “The Pearl Reader” By Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

To order “The Pearl Reader” and “Magic 8 and The Bone Marrow Sucker,” two delightful collections of poems by Ghanaian-American poet, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu, see below links.  Available from the website, or the publisher on trafford.com or from Amazon.com or Chapters in Indigo in Canada and coming soon on Barnes and Noble online. Enter your contact information at www.magic8book.com to receive future notices about upcoming book releases.

Magic 8 & the Bone Marrow Sucker:

https://www.amazon.com/Magic-Bone-Marrow-Sucker-Collected/dp/1490766499/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500068880&sr=8-1&keywords=9781490766492

http://www.trafford.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-001047266

www.magic8book.com

In Canada:

https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-CA/home/search/?keywords=Afua%20Serwah%20Osei-Bonsu

The Pearl Reader:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1490783482/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500069192&sr=8-1&keywords=9781490783482

http://www.trafford.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-001049410

www.thepearlreader.com

 

 

 

An Approach to Art Making #2

An Approach to Art Making #2

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Art could be divided into groups such as:  supply, craft and manufacturing artist.

Supply relates to those things derivative of materials and supplies that could be purchased, for example, from an art supply store.  A good example of a supply oriented art work may be one that incorporates nibs, brushes and ink like Oriental Paintings or Bonsai garden paintings with fan brushes or outdoor art stations.

Craft may be things oriented to craftsmanship, from an artisan or may even be home spun. Examples may be things like burning into leathers, making candles, or a bricklayers training in tile, marble and terrazzo and making monuments or perhaps building engraved picture frames, cake decoration, or making clay monsters, or a holiday decoration or a cut out turkey made of paper or maybe some type of whittler.

A Manufacturing Artist may make sophisticated art works in a studio or factory based environment inclusive of sculptural works or electronic works or even professional frescoes via fresco printers and architectural works or installations or programmatic/technological works, or even the museum itself and mostly extremely fine art and almost all high art.

Culture is another distinct road in approaches to art making.  Dedication to culture may inspire one to develop a culture or work on a subculture.  An artist may become concerned with cultural branding or contributing an aspect of art or art practice that develops their communities culture.  A cultural offering may set the tone for a business or enterprise or an organization, branding it and guiding its organizational epistemology or setting the tone for employees.

High art practice is often engaged in a curatorial based art making where a group of artists may utilize the same photo to curate a group exhibition.  The photos are sometimes based on iconic imagery or indicative of an era.  Groups of artists and curators may form a temporary or permanent collective group.

What a scholar might find really riveting, that is perhaps buried now is the initial use or heading of “The Arts” that was inclusive of science etc.  In the early days of education, there were three subject’s religion, the arts and medicine.

Use of acronyms in art can be a way of “big talking” -small or formulaic. Acronyms like “HISS” that means “highlight, spotlight and showcase” become important or acronyms like “Quepine” that means “Question, Proverb and News” can be used for art making.

Black Magic is also indicative of a kind of wielding or wizardry or technology use or logic. Black magic use can be something like programming things with thoughts by thinking over them, or digging holes or making connections between objects or talking to things or taking readings or working with numbers like 81 as Magic and Flight where you see in the eight a Spider and the one, a wing.  Black Magic brings as James Baldwin coined it, “force vitale,” to art among other things much like the Chinese technique of calling “chi” or soul or “charming,” or animating like placing eyes on something.

One may draw a right angle with a diagonal cross thread through to create an art technique using perhaps era or time. It’s possible to grid or work on a time-based series using a right angle quick method.

“Era and Charm,” incorporates a black magic technique and has been very successful for making things like teapots.

Another interesting technique used by artists is “what does that make you think of?”  This technique has to do with when you ask continuous questions of yourself or someone else leading to a trail of words away from a root word.  For example, if I said I have an apple, what does that make you think of?  You said red, and then I said what does red make you think of?  You said blood etc. and on and on and connected the trail back to apple to ascertain some unique, hidden, connected or passive meaning.  With this dialogue, one would begin to build their artworks from a kind of “art game playing.”

Another breakthrough in technology that has gotten into art is “the feed.”  The feed has to do with when you send through a host, an agent or program.  The feed can be music or emotion etc. Feeds or programs are particularly interesting in textile printing where a print may be made distinct when it is impacted by a program and made, for example, exciting or sensual, animated or dotted.

Perhaps a breakthrough in approaches to art making is the “eclectic gallery district” or the placement of art or the combining of supply, craft, manufacturing art etc.  All the usual pomp of art but inclusive of perhaps a “home sweet home sign maker” or portrait district or maker galleries or antiques or fiber arts or a variety of textile galleries-eclecticism in art may also be a mainstay. Eclecticism in art may create a greater ability of “treasure trove” and individuality within the home or arts final destination.

Really ultimately what makes or can make a really good fine artist is lots and lots of programs, lots and lots of technology. Artech can be many things including sound technologies or opera voice pieces, or holograph technology or film modulation technology etc.