Book List: Art & Fiber

 

The Painters Handbook:  A Complete Reference  By, Mark David Gottsegen

Water, Paper, Paint By Heather Smith Jones

 

Tie-Dye The How to Book Virginia Gleser

Book Publishing Company

P.O. Box 99

Summertown, TN 38483

1-888-260-8458

http:/bpc.thefarm.org

Dharma Trading Co. Fiber Arts Supplies Catalog

Dharma Trading Co., 1994

P.O. Box 150916

San Rafael, CA 94915

1-800-542-5227

catalog@dharmatrading.com

www.dharmatrading.com

 

Goodwin, Jill  A Dyers Manual. London:  Palham Books, 1982

 

Museum of Contemporary Crafts of the American Crafts Council.  Fabric Vibrations:  Tie and Fold Dye Wall Hangings and Environments.  New York:  Museum of Contemporary Crafts of The American Crafts Council, 1972

 

Shaw, Robin and Jennifer.  Batik:  New Look at an Ancient Art, New York, Doubleday and Co., 1974

 

Toshiko Ito, Tsujigahana.  The Flower of Japanese Textile Art, Tokyo:  Kodansha International 1981

Yamanobe, Tomoyuki, ed. Opulence:  The Kimonos and Robes of Itchiku Kubota.  New York:  Kodansha International USA Ltd., 1984

 

Harmony Enterprises

512 14h Street

Modesto, CA 95354

1-209-571-2767

www.harmonytie-dyes.com

(to order tie dyes, dye kit and book)

 

Pro Chemical and Dye Co.

P.O. Box 14

Somerset, MA 02726

1-800-2BUYDYE

www.prochemical.com (more dying instructions)

 

Rupert, Gibbon and Spider, Inc.

P.O. Box 425

Healdsburg, CA 95440

1-800-442-0455

 

Batik

The Art and Craft

By ILA Keller

 

Suppliers

Craftools Inc.

1 Industrial Road

Wood-Ridge, New Jersey 07075

 

Aljo Manufacturing  Co.

116 Prince Street

New York, New York 10012

 

Geigy Chemical Co.

Box 430

Yonkers, New York

 

Ciba Chemical & Dye Co.

Fairlawn, New Jersey

 

E.I.  Dupont de Nemours, Co.

Wilmington, Delaware

 

Beckers

Sveavagen 42

Stockholm, Sweden

Boil Proof Color for Cotton and Cellulose Fabrics

Levafix Dying

Veronal Dyestuff

Box 385

Union, New Jersey  07083

 

Wax, dyes, tjantings, stretchers, dyes,

Tjap

Block Prints

Tjanting Pengado

 

The Art of Batik By R. Soeprapto

 

Art and Crafts in Indonesia (Ministry of Information, Djakarta)

 

Oriental Brushwork  Wang Chi-Yuan

How to Paint the Chinese Way  jean Long

Sashiko   Mary Parker

Lessons in Bobbin Lace Making  Doris Southard

Lacemaking Channerr CC

Practical Skills in Bobbin Lace  Bridget Cook

Pillow Lace  Mincoff and Marriage

The Technique of Torchon Lace Pam Nottingham

Technique of Design Chuny Lace , L Paulis

Milanese Lace Read and Kincaid

Introduction to Honiton Lace Susanne Thompson

A Dictionary of Lace Pat Earnshaw

Lace and Lace Making Marian Powys

Beggars Lace

P.O Box 17263

Denver, CO 80217

Cindys Stitches

588-A Roger Williams

Highland Park, IL 60035

 

The Lacemaker

7721 230th Ave SW

Edmonds, WA 98020

 

Lacis

2982 Adeline St.

Berkley, CA 94703

 

Robin and Russ Handweavers

533 North Adams ST.

McMinnville, OR 97128

 

Robbins Bobbins

Rte 1 Box 1736

Mineral Bluff, Georgia 30559

 

Van Sciver Bobbin Lace

130 Cascadilla Park

Ithaca, NY 14850

 

The Great Lakes Groups

Mrs. Robert A. Campbell

207 Wilson Ave.

Ypsilanti, MI 48197

 

International Old Lacers INC

124 W. Irvington Place

Denver, CO 80223-1539

 

The Silk Painting Workshop

Painting, Marbling and Batik

Jane Venables

 

Decoration on Fabric

Pauline Brown

 

Silk Painting

Vibeke Born

 

Authentic American Indian Beadwork

Pamela Stanley-Millner

Diane Fitzgeralds Favorite Beading Projects

 

Designer Bead Embroidery

Kenneth King

 

The Kashmir Shawl

Frank Ames

 

Soft Furnishings By Hamlyn

 

Complete Guide to Quilting  Better Homes and Gardens

 

Formulas, Methods, Tips and Data

Swezey and Scharff

Geometry for Dummies

 

Reference

Ypsilanti District Library Collection

Up to Snuff #43: English Writers

Up to Snuff #43:  English Writers

William Shakespeare

Charles Dickens

Jane Austen

Geoffrey Chaucer

George Orwell

Virginia Woolf

Agatha Christie

Charlotte Bronte

Lewis Carroll

Oscar Wilde

George Eliot

Samuel Taylor Coleri

John Milton

George Gordon Byron

William Wordsworth

D.H. Lawrence

Samuel Johnson

Thomas Hardy

E.M. Forster

Arthur Conan Doyle

Daniel Defoe

John Bunyan

J.R.R. Tolkien

J.K. Rowling

John Donne

Emily Bronte

Francis Bacon

Rudyard Kipling

Winston Churchill

Wilkie Collins

Aldous Huxley

Jonathon Swift

Salman Rushdie

Mark Twain

H.G. Wells

Joseph Conrad

Ben Jonson

Anthony Burgess

Enid Blyton

George Chapman

John Keats

Douglas Adams

Roald Dahl

  1. Somerset Maugham

Christopher Marlowe

Graham Greene

Thomas Dekker

John Dryden

W.B. Yeats

Henry James

Joseph Addison

William Blake

Daphne DuMaurier

Wilkie Collins

Mina Loy

Malcolm Lowry

Up to Snuff #42: Mexican Poets

Up to Snuff #42: Mexican Poets

Octavio Paz

Juana Ines de la Cruz

Rosario Castellanos

Jaime Sabines

Jose Emilio Pacheco

Arturo Meza

Enrique Gonzalez

Alberto Blanco

Pita Amor

Amado Nervo

Bocofloja

Elvia Ardalani

Elsa Cross

Homero Aridjis

Alejandro Aura

Sandra Cisneros

Elena Garro

Esther Seligson

Ana Castillo

Carmen Alardin

Francisco Hinojosa

Joaquin Garrido

Jose Maria Pino Suarez

Renato Prada Oropeza

Nezahualco

Antonio Alatorre

Daniel Sada

Andres Henestrosa

Ignacio Ramirez

 

Assessment of National Emigration Policy Adjustments as They Pertain to African and U.S. Foreign Relations

Assessment of National Emigration Policy Adjustments as They Pertain to African and U.S. Foreign Relations

 

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Interdisciplinary Studies in Leadership

Norwich University

May 29, 2017

Summary

The following report is an assessment of national and regional emigration policy as they pertain to African and U.S. foreign relations. The basis of this assessment is extracted from research conducted by Timothy J. Hatton of the University of Essex and Jeffrey G. Williamson of Harvard University titled, “Demographic and Economic Pressure on Emigration out of Africa.”  The research was prepared for and presented at a conference on “Population Dynamics and The Macro Economy” at Harvard University, September 11-12th, 2000.

This report will analyze the findings of the Hatton & Williamson research.  Hatton & Williamson compared African emigration with the European exodus to the New World in the 19th century and looks at what forces are drivers in emigration both regionally and across borders.

Table of Contents

Summary                                                                                                                 i

Introduction                                                                                                            3

The Drivers of Emigration   Past and Present                                                   4

Wages and Economic Disparities                                                               5

War and Upheaval                                                                                         6

Demographic Booms (Figure 1)                                                                  6

The Impact of Emigration, Sending and Receiving—————————————–                                                                  6

Conclusions                                                                                                               7

Appendix A:——————————————————————————————–n/a

Appendix B:                                                                                                          n/a

References                                                                                                                  8

2

Introduction

This report is divided into two main sections that look at the first the drivers of emigration as it pertains to African and U.S. foreign relations.  The three particular drivers examined will be wages and economic disparities, war and upheaval and demographic booms.  The research will be extracted from Hatton and Williamson’s proposal, “Demographic and Economic Pressure on Emigration out of Africa.” The last section will look at population dynamics and ramifications of emigration in a fourth subheading titled “Impact of Emigration Sending and Receiving.” The conclusion will look at proposals such as Hatton and Williamson’s work towards a solution to the problem of net migration and its connected problems.

The Drivers of Emigration

Many have been known to migrate outside their borders as was detailed by Hatton & Williamson’s research.  Hatton and Williamson suggested several key forces that drive emigration regionally and across borders.  It was detailed by Hatton and Williamson that many choose to emigrant to OECD countries with higher wages which is the: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.  The OECD includes the following countries:

Figure 1. OECD Member Countries with Dates of Entry into Organization
AUSTRALIA 7 June 1971
AUSTRIA 29 September 1961
BELGIUM 13 September 1961
CANADA 10 April 1961
CHILE 7 May 2010
CZECH REPUBLIC 21 December 1995
DENMARK 30 May 1961
ESTONIA 9 December 2010
FINLAND 28 January 1969
FRANCE 7 August 1961
GERMANY 27 September 1961
GREECE 27 September 1961
HUNGARY 7 May 1996
 

 

ICELAND 5 June 1961
IRELAND 17 August 1961
ISRAEL 7 September 2010
ITALY 29 March 1962
JAPAN 28 April 1964
KOREA 12 December 1996
LATVIA 1 July 2016
LUXEMBOURG 7 December 1961
MEXICO 18 May 1994
NETHERLANDS 13 November 1961
NEW ZEALAND 29 May 1973
NORWAY 4 July 1961
POLAND 22 November 1996
PORTUGAL 4 August 1961
SLOVAK REPUBLIC 14 December 2000
SLOVENIA 21 July 2010
SPAIN 3 August 1961
SWEDEN 28 September 1961
SWITZERLAND 28 September 1961
TURKEY 2 August 1961
UNITED KINGDOM 2 May 1961
UNITED STATES 12 April 1961

 

OECD, however is not inclusive of the entire world and does not include any African countries whatsoever.  It is not clear, what is the criteria for membership into such a group as OECD and what one would hope for as an outcome?  It is claimed by Hatton and Williamson’s research that OECD countries were “go to” countries where Africans have chosen to emigrate in search of higher wages that appear to run tandem with advanced development.

It is not clear, if Africans were deliberately excluded from such groups as OECD, who initiated the OECD and what were their chief goals and concerns. The earliest date of membership is dated 12 April 1961 with the United States as the earliest member.  In January of 1961, John F. Kennedy assumed the Presidency of the

4

United States until 1963 and likely initiated the OECD with Dwight D. Eisenhower as Vice President.

According to Hatton and Williamson (1998, pg.3), “legal restrictions into high wage OECD countries have certainly choked off potential migration.” What is suggested by Hatton and Williamson’s quote is that migration among Africans may have been deliberately contemplated and directed with legal and myriad restrictions.

According to the OECD:

“Convention No. 143 adopted by the 1975 ILO

Conference defines clandestine or illegal migration movements as those where migrants find themselves during their journey, on arrival or during their period of residence and employment [in] conditions contravening relevant international multilateral or bilateral instruments or agreements, or national laws or regulations.” (Moulier Boutang, Garson and Silberman, 1986). “This definition places the stress on the diverse aspects of irregularity: entry, residence in the host country and the undertaking of an occupation.”

What the OECD illustrated was that recipient countries were limited in terms of their acceptance of new entrants.  (OECD, 1999, pg.293) Regulations generally governed access to the labor markets.  “This policy orientation is now common to all countries of Europe, particularly the new countries of immigration in the South (i.e. Italy, Spain, Greece & Portugal) as well as  to North America, although US and Canada are still open to regular immigration.” (OECD, 199, pg. 293)

 

Wages and Economic Disparities

Hatton and Williamson (1998, pg.482) cited OECD wage increase of 40% by 2025 as having an impact on wage disparities between the African Continent and what are considered “developed” OECD nations.  Wages are said to be one of the chief drivers historically of migration that drove the Europeans to migrate in the 19th century.  If past predicts future, differences in economy will parallel migration as citizens go in search for a better quality of life. Many of those who emigrate also attract their friends and family to their host country and a “friends and family theory,” was supported by Hatton and Williamson (1998, pg. 483).  “A third of African arriving in the 1990’s classified as close relatives of U.S. citizens.”(Hatton & Williamson, 1998, pg. 480)

5

War & Upheaval

Several key indicators were cited by Hatton and Williamson (1998, pgs. 483-484) including achieving a refugee status, the HIV/AIDS epidemic, war and political upheaval. Examples such as how 100,000 refugees from Burundi returned to their home country in early 1994 as soon as fighting receded by way of the UNHCR Resettlement and Repatriation Act. Civil war in Zaire in 1996 when the Mobutu regime was overthrown 600,000 or 700,000 Rwandan’s became refugees. (Hatton & Williamson, 1998, pg. 480)

There is a World Refugee Survey that details global population migration.  Hatton and Williamson suggested that during conflicts citizens become refugees and are pushed across borders to neighboring countries rural areas and live in settlements.  Refugees often return to their home country where they fair better assimilation, cultural commonalities and support network.

 

Demographic Booms

Commodity booms such as cocoa production in Ghana and mineral oil in Nigeria have caused large numbers to migrate. There are also rural-urban migrations that do not appear to be impacted by education. Those with more education seem to fare well in the rural-urban shifts. Youth aged 15-29 appear to be the biggest numbers migrating as  work environments get over-crowded, spurring the youth to go elsewhere to seek jobs. (Hatton & Williamson, 1998, pg. 483)

 

The Impact of Emigration Sending and Receiving

OECD has formed stringent policy on curbing migration into their areas.  Hatton and Williamson cited a theory called “net out” where accepting emigrants or clandestine emigrants to one’s country may push others out even replace them in work.  There is a wide spread fear in receiving countries that emigrants will replace their citizens in work, often working harder and for lower wages. In some cases emigrants are described as roaming work forces.

 

6

Even the slightest knowledge about wage increases elsewhere can ignite regional or cross border exchanges.  Hatton and Williamson did not go into detail about the long term effects of migration.  The OECD report detailed legal versus illegal immigration and at what point one is breaking the law.

 

Conclusion 

Other things still may impact African emigration.  The African’s who are successfully emigrating are likely students and were in pursuit of an education.  Still others may be beholden to their architecture as OCED also cited Moroccan’s as migrating into southern Europe.  Morocco has clay structured cave like housing that after new generations were born the architecture may no longer accommodate them.  Depending on one’s lense, these cultural curiosities, highly skilled, roaming work forces may be welcome or not welcome.  Emigrants in France were said to have taken over ~17% of the country.  No one seems to be compassionate when upheaval occurs, and no one appears to look for root causes that may remedy a problem or a suffering population within or outside their home country.

Population dynamics and the factors that shift net migration are diverse but perhaps just a handful of things makes one pick up and leave their home country in search very often for an all-around better quality of life-inclusive of health care, education, food supply, housing, government, lack of war, higher wage and a possibility to elevate themselves and their extended family via wiring monies home etc.  Perhaps conditions become unbearable or unlivable or too hostile or countries go into transition and world organizations do and do not respond effectively.

Additional information can be found by looking at Census Bureau statistics, reports from the United Nations, and The World Refugee Survey.

7

References

Hatton, Timothy J. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., Demographic and Economic Pressure on Emigration out of Africa, Scandinavia Journal of Economics, 105(3), 465–486, 2003, 1998

List of OECD Member Countries, http://www.oecd.org/about/membersandpartners/list-oecd-member-countries.htm

Annual Report, Trends in International Migration:  Continuous Reporting System on Migration, 1999 Edition, https://www.oecd.org/migration/mig/2717683.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

Demystifying Vaccines, What Current Reports are saying

By Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

1) Originally reported to elicit the retraction of the UK’s “Lancet” paper that alleged a link between developmental disabilities such as autism mixed with bowel disorders and colitis with the MMR Vaccine were several charges including : 1) “manufactured appearance of purported medical syndrome by Andrew Wakefield,” 2) “findings and results of a small sample group were reported as facts,” 3) “clinical records were reinterpreted to suit self (Wakefield)”, 4) there was no record of children’s health concerns with National Health Service, 5) “omitted correct information about purpose of the study,” 6) “Wakefield cited for dishonesty by Medical Research Council Panel in regards to sources of funding and who patients were”, 7) ‘illegally obtained Legal Aid monies to pay for study,” 8) anonymized patients, 9) disbelief in probability that 12 families went to same hospital at same time for same thing in a matter of days.
2) Why the premeditated selection of patients was such a damnable offense by Wakefield was that it presented an inaccurate sample group, too small and without geographical range which suggests an improbable statistic that these 12 anonymized cases be representative of the whole. What was truly devastating about the Wakefield allegations were that needed vaccine usage plummeted and could have triggered epidemics. One consequence that was described in “Statistics in Medical Research” by P. Sprent has to do with “when resources are wasted when trial or experiment is too small to have any hope of determining whether or not a potentially important treatment response occurs..” Sprent claims that “statistics provide rational measures to reflect the degree of uncertainty associated with databased assertions.” Sprent goes on to say that “statistics provide indicators as to how well data conforms to mathematical models.” The statistician needs assurance that “the number of cases selected is adequate to make inferences.” The use of a sample group to make inferences relevant to a population is called inferential statistics. Statisticians are said by Sprent to “sometimes make further assumptions that are only approximately true in order to calculate the relevant measures.”
3) 3a) How the scientific process is self-correcting has to do with testing and replication of a hypothesis and peer review. Wakefield was eventually subject to peer review that tested his hypothesis and refuted it. All science is subject to this way of “replication” which as a rule weeds out weak hypotheses.
Was it in the end incumbent upon a British journalist, Brian Deer, to expose Wakefield’s fraudulent activity and business practices in a sensational series of articles? Was journalism in fact Wakefield’s police? Many people with “fear unleashed” by Wakefield’s alleged linkage of disease with vaccination potentially killed or injured or was impetus for epidemics. Science may not have covered the issues to the extent necessary or swiftly enough to save lives. The original article in United Kingdom’s “The Lancet” medical paper was not retracted for ~12 years and many people suffered insecurity with said information. There were not credible sources to verify the information and it was followed by widespread mistrust of medicine. Wakefield appeared to profiteer in a bewildering fashion and it is unclear where to find the checks and balances for healthcare profiteering. It is as if in the case of Wakefield who desired to form a company based on an anti vaccine hypothesis and related bio engineering technologies such as a molecular viral diagnostic test for Britain and America that he hoped to profit 72.5m pounds a year from.
3c) The results were startling. According to the “Jenny McCarthy Body count” which contains
Statistics from up until 2015. McCarthy reported that the anti-vaccine movement and televised promotion by celebrities from June 3rd, 2007 to July 18, 2015 there were ~152,763 directly related preventable illnesses. From June 3rd, 2007 to July 18, 2015 there were 9,028 preventable deaths connected to the anti-vaccine movement. According to McCarthy there were 0 autism diagnoses linked to vaccines from June 3rd, 2007 to July 18, 2015. The anti-vaccine movement was linked directly to a British medical report in “The Lancet” in 1998 by a gastroenterologist Dr. Wakefield, who was later indicted with myriad criminal charges when many scientific and legal examinations disproved evidence.

Footnotes

1)RETRACTED: Wakefield A., et al., The Lancet 1998; 351:638-641 Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children
2)http://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2011/01/06/brian-deer-piltdown-medicine-the-missing-link-between-mmr-and-autism/ BMJ Opinion, Brian Deer: Piltdown medicine: The missing link between MMR and autism,

3)http://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2011/01/06/brian-deer-piltdown-medicine-the-missing-link-between-mmr-and-autism/ BMJ
Opinion, Brian Deer: Piltdown medicine: The missing link between MMR and autism,

4)Sprent, P., Statistics in Medical Research pg. 523

5)Sprent, P., Statistics in Medical Research pg. 523
6)Sprent, P., Statistics in Medical Research pg. 523
7)Sprent, P., Statistics in Medical Research pg. 524
8)http://www.jennymccarthybodycount.com/
9)http://www.jennymccarthybodycount.com/

La Mirada (cancion en espanol)

La Mirada

por, Afua Osei-Bonsu

 

En la montana

En la bosque

En la selba

En el campo

En el espejo

 

En el edificio

En el cuarto

En el rio

En la cascada

 

En la ventana

 

En tu Mirada

Encuentro mi amor

 

Fui buscando

Magnetizando

Y llegaste, mi amor

 

Lla llegaste

Lla llegaste

Lla llegaste, mi amor

Vamos juntos

En caballo

A la bosque

A comer frutas

 

Lluvia de estrellas

Luna llena

La Locura

De nostros

 

Quitaste la

Tristeza

Del lobo

Que vivio

En arbol

De la magia

Pura magia

Que guardaba

Por ti

 

Lla llegaste (3)

Por mi

 

Te quiero

 

Zapatos de Hombre

Zapatos de Hombre

By Afua Osei-Bonsu

 

Zapatos de hombre

Calzoncillos gigantes

Lagrimas de poo poo

Dibujos de suelo

Sabores de exstasis

Sabor de la pee pee

Escondido en su mente

Corriendo en la bosque

Con telefono

Espalda de gazelle

Vagina brillante

Pelo al piso

Boca sangriendo

 

 

Spicy Tea in The Morning to Invigorate You

Spicy tea in the morning to invigorate you

Bring you to a full wakefulness

Via the stimulation of the senses

____________________________________________________________________________

Masala Tea

2 tea bags black tea (Earl Grey Tea)

2 ½ cups water

1 cup milk

½ tsp vanilla

2 slices ginger root

½ tsp cardamom

5 cloves

1 cinnamon stick

5 black peppercorn

Sweeten with sugar, honey, or maple syrup

On the stove bring all ingredients to a boil.  Froth milk. Remove pan from heat.  Pour through strainer into teapot.  Serve hot.

Serves 2

 

 

 

Up to Snuff #2: Winter Book List Mostly French, Spanish, African Titles

Up to Snuff #2:  Book List Winter 2017, Mostly French titles, some Spanish and African

By Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Figure Drawing for All its worth By Andrew Loomis

Nordic Cook book Chef Magnus Nillsson (Phaidon)

PHD dissertations

Edward Tufte

John Locke Essay “On Human Understanding”

Writing in the Disciplines (documents vintage writing styles)

Cassell’s Latin Dictionary

The Calligraphy Source Book or other books for penmanship

Bernard Levin, Enthusiasms Scrapbook of Styles

www.thebalance.com   (career notes)

The Seed Garden (The Art and Practice of Seed Saving) Michael Colby

The Manual of Seed Saving By Andrea Heistinger

Lettres de mon moulin  Alphonse Daudet (French)

Prevost  by, Manon Lescaut (French)

Balzac, Un debut dans la vie

Baudelaire, Le Fleurs du Mal

Beccaria, Des Delits et des Peines

Castiglione, Le Livre du Courtisan

Chateaubriand, Vie de Rance

Chretien de Troyes, Le Chevalier au Lion

Conrad, Nostromo

Dumas, Les Bords du Rhin

Fielding, Joseph Andrews

Flaubert, Memoires d’un Fou

Fromentin, Une annee dans le Sahel

Gautier, Le Capitaine Fracasse

Gogol, Tarass Boulba

Hume, Enquete sure le principes de la morale

Kafka, Dans la colonie penetentiare et autres nouvelles

Kant, Vers la Paix perpetuelle

Kleist, La Marquise D’O

Laxness La Clouche d’islande

Loti, Madame Chrysantheme

Machiavel, L’Art de la guerre

Marivaux, Les acteurs de bonne foi

Maupassant, Notre Coeur

Melville, Mardi

Morand, Hiver Caraibe

Moravia, Les Indifferents

Nerval, Aurelia et autres textes autobiographiques

Nietzche, Le Livre du Philosophie

Platon, Menon

Plaute, Theatre

Prevost, Histoire d’une Grecque Moderne

Quesnay, Physiocratie

Shakespeare, Henry V

Smith, La Richesse de Nations

Stael, De L’Allemagne

Stevenson, L’lle au Tresor

Strindberg, Tschandala

Terence, Theatre

Thackeray, Barry Lyndon

Michel Butor, La Modification

Marguerite Duras, Moderato Cantabile

Boris Vian, L’automne a Pekin

Alain Robbe-Grillet, La Maison de Rendez Vous

Roman Jakobson, Essais de linguistique genera, les fondations du language

Robert Linhart, L’etabli

Samuel  Beckett, Molloy

Claude Simon, La route des Flandres

Claude Simon, L’Herbe

Robert Pinget, L’inquisitoire

Annie Ernaux, Les armoires vides

C.G. Jung, Ma vie (Souvenirs, reves et pensees)

Anne Wiazemsky, Mon beau navire

Margaret Atwood, the Handmaids Tale

Phillip Roth, La contrevie

Rilke, Les Carnets de Malte Laurids  Briggs

Vladimir Nabokov, La meprise

Vladmir Nabokov, Autres Rivages

Bertrand Poirot-Delpech, Le Golfe de Gascogne

Cami, Drames de la vie courante

Georges Darien, Gottlieb Krumm (Made in England)

William Faulkner, Treize histoires

Pascal Quignard, Le escaliers de Chambord

Nathalie Sarraute, Tu ne t’aimes pas

Pietro Citati, Kafka

Jean d’Ormesson, Garcon de quoi ecrire

Michel Deon, Louis XIV par lui-meme

James Hadley Chase, Le fin mot de l’histoire

Zoe Oldenburg, Le process du reve

Plaute, Theatre complet I

Plaute, Theatre complet II

Mehdi Charef, Le harki de Meriem

Naguib Mahfouz

Nijinsky, Journal

Jorge Amado, Les terres du bout du monde

Jorge Amado, Suor

Hector Bianciotti, Seules les larmes seront competes

Sylvie Germain, Jours de colere

Pierre Magnan, L’amant du poivre d’ane

Jim Thompson, Un chouette petit lot

Pierre Bourgeade, L’empire de livres

Emile Zola, La Faute de l’abbe Mouret

Serge Gainsbourg, Mon proper role 1

Serge Gainsbourg, Mon proper role 2

Thomas Bernhard, Le neveu de Wittgenstein

Daniel Boulanger, Mes coquins

Albert Camus, La mort heureuse

Didier Daeninckx, Le facteur fatal

Jean Delay, Avant Memoire I

Romain Gary, Adieu Gary Cooper

Alfred de Vigny, Servitude et grandeur millitaires

Patrick Modiano, Voyage de noces

Pierre Moinot, Armes et bagages

J.-B Pontalis, Loin

John Steinbeck, La Coupe d’or

Gisele Halimi, La cause des femmes

Khalil Gibran, Le Prophete

Boileau-Narcejac, Le bonsai

Frederic H. Fajardie, Un homme en harmonie

Michel Mohrt, Le telesiege

Vladimir Nabokov, Pnine

Vladimir Nabokov, Le don

Carlos Onetti, Les bas-fonds du reve

Daniel Pennac, La petite marchande de prose

Guy Rachet, Le soleil de la perse

Georges Steiner, Anno Domini

Mario Vargas Llosa, L’homme qui parle

Marguerite Yourcenar, En pelerine et en etranger

Voltaire, Zadig et autres contes

Regis Debray, Les masques

Diane Johnson, Dashiell Hammett:  une vie

Yachar Kemal, Tourterelle, ma tourterelle

Julia Kristeva, Les Samourais

Pierre Magnan, Le mystere de Seraphin

Mouland Mammeri, La colline oubliee

Francis Ryck, Mourir avec moi

John Saul, L’ennemi de bien

Jean-Loup Trassard, Campagnes de Russie

Francis Walder, Saint Germain ou la negociation

Voltaire, Candide et autres contes

Robert Mallet, Region inhabitee

Oscar Wilde, Le Portrait de Dorian Gray

Rene Fregni, Les Chemins noirs

Patrick Besson, Les petits maux d’amour

Henri Bosco, Antonin

Paule Constant, White Spirit

Pierre Gamarra, Cantilene occitane

Herve Guibert, A l’ami qui ne m’a pas sauve la vie

Tony Hillerman, Le Peuple de l’ombre

Yukio Mishima, Le Temple de l’aube

Francois Salvaing, De purs desastres

Sempe, Par Avion

Jim Thompson, Eliminatoires

John Updike, Rabbit rattrape

Diderot, Jacque le fataliste

Kirishima, Kazuhiro  Memoires D’un Lutteur de sumo

Rosario Castellanos, Bella dama sin piedad y otros poemas

Carlos Fuentes, La muetre de Artemio Cruz

Juan Rulfo, El Llano en llamas

Miguel Leon-Portilla, Los antiguos Mexicanos

Octavio Paz, Libertad bajo palabra

Rodolfo Usigli, El gesticulador

Rosario Castellanos, Balun Canan

Fernando Benitez, La ruta de Hernan Cortes

Ramon Lopez Velarde, La Suave Patria

Edmund Valades, la muerte tiene permisso

Alfonso Caso, El pueblo de sol

Jose Vasconcelos, Ulises criolla

Jose Vasconcelos, Ulises criollo segunda parte

Jose Gorostiza, Muerte sin fin

Alfonso Reyes, Vision de Anahuac

Agustin Yanez, La tierra prodiga

Gutierra Tibon, El ombligo como centro erotico

Julio Torri, De fusilamientos

Charles Brasseur, Viaje por el istmo de Tehuantepec

Salvador Novo, Nuevo Amor

Salvador Toscano, Cuauhtemoc

Juan de la Cabada, Maria La Voz

Carlos Pellicer, Hora de Junio Practica de vuelo

Mariano Azuela, Mala Yerba Y Esa sange

Emilio Carballido, Rosalba Y los Llaveros

Popol Vuh

Vicente T. Mendoza, Lirica infantile de Mexico

Octavio Paz, El laberinto de la soledad

Efren Hernandez, La Paloma, el sotano y la torre

Carlos Fuentes, Las buenas conciencias

Laurette Sejourne, Pensamiento y religion en el Mexico antiguo

Sergio Galindo, El Bordo

Rosario Castellanos, Mujer que sabe latin

Rafael F. Munoz, Santa Anna

Ramon Rubrin, La bruma la vuelve azul

Mauricio Magdaleno, El ardiente verano

Xavier Villaurrutia, Nostalgia de la muerte

Francisco de la Maza, El guadalupanismo mexicano

El Libro de los Libros de Chilam Balam

J.L Martinez, Nezahualcoyotl

Rojas Gonzalez, La venganza de Carlos Mango

  1. Paula Kolonitz, Un viaje a Mexico en 1864

Sergio Magana, Los signos del Zodiaco

Luisa Josefina Hernandez, Los frutos caidos

Hector Mendoza, Las cosas simples

Ricardo Pozas, Juan Perez Jolote

Jose Pacheco, Fin de siglo

Fernando Benitez, El agua envenenada

Alfonso Reyes, La cena

Francisco L. Urquizo, Fui soldado de levita

Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer

Henry Miller, Tropic of Capricorn

Sylvia Beach, Shakespeare and Company

Barnes, Djuna  The Book of Repulsive Women

Boyd, Ernest, Portraits:  Real and Imaginary

Boyle, Kay, Collection of 9 letters

Dorris, Michael, A Yellow Raft in Blue Water

Munson, Gorham B. Waldo Frank:  A Study

Stearns, Harold, Confessions of Harvard Man

Camus, Albert, La Chute, Folio, 1956

Sartre, Huis clos suivi de Les mouches

Aragon, Le paysan de Paris, Folio, 1926

Nina Berberova, L’accompagnatrice, Roman

Camara Laye, L’enfant noir

Jean Paul Satre, Classiques du Siecle

Francois Mauriac, Therese Desqueyroux

Francois Mauriac, Le Mystere Frontenac

Francois Mauriac, Le Noeud De Viperes

Francois Mauriac, La fin de la Nuit

Francois Mauriac, Genitrix

Francois Mauriac, Le Desert de L’Amour

Francois Mauriac, Le Baiser Au Lepreux

Jean Cocteau, Le Machine Infernale

Edmond Rostand, Cyrano De Bergerac

Alphonse Daudet, Lettres de on moulin

Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du mal et autres poems

Diderot, Jacques le fataliste

Manon Lescaut, Prevost

Michel Butor, La Modification

Annie Ernaux, Les armoires vides

Pablo Neruda, Antologia General

Ben okri the famished road

 

Maryse Conde I, tituba

 

Wole Soyinka

 

Ishmael Reed

 

Rebeka, Njau

 

Amos, Tutuola

 

Chikwenye Okonjo Ogunyemi

 

flying home Ralph Ellison

 

Catherine acholonu  ogbanje: a motif and a theme in the poetry of chrisotpher okigbo

 

Niyi Osundare  the poem as a mythic-linguistic event:  the study of soyinkas abiku

 

Nobel Prize speeches Soyinka and Morrison

 

Bessie Head maru, the collector of treasures

 

Ama Ata Aidoo  an angry letter in January

 

Jamaica Kincaid  lucy

 

Sindiwe Magona  to my childrens children

 

Lauretta Ngcobo  and they didn’t die

 

Tess Onwueme  go tell it to women

 

Susheila Nasta motherlands

 

Assata Ashakur  assata an autobiography

 

Nafissatou Diallo a Dakar childhood

 

Buchi Emecheta  a second class citizen

 

Camara laye the dark child the autobiography of an African boy

 

Wa thiong’o ngugi  detained a writers prison diary

 

Winnie Mandela part of my soul went with him

 

Ezekiel Mphahlele  down second avenue

 

Itabari Njeri every goodbye aint gone

 

Nkrumah, Kwame Ghana the autobiography of kwame Nkrumah

 

James Olney autobiography essay theoretical and critical

 

The beautiful ones are not born yet

 

Mariama Ba so long a letter

 

Rebeka Njau ripples in the pool

 

Flora Nwapa one is enough

 

Ntozake Shange sassafras, cypress and indigo

 

Rainbows Newton

 

Rabelais Gargantua and Pantegruel

 

Great Books Britainica

 

Tom Jones  Henry Fielding

 

Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen

 

Le Rouge and le Noir  Stendahl

 

Le Pere Goriot Balzac

 

Madame Bovary Flaubert

 

Moby Dick Herman Melville

 

Wuthuring Heights Emily Bronte

 

The Brothers Karamozov  Dostoyevsky

 

War and Peace Tolstoy

 

Chaos theory books

 

Herman Hesse

 

Langston Hughes

 

Back issues of NKA

 

Back issues of Revue Noire

 

Foreign Affairs

 

Bees

 

Hummingbirds

 

Butterflies

 

Impressionist Art

 

Special powers books I can find

 

Keats Irish folktales

 

 

Chinua Achebe-things Fall Apart, No Longer at Ease, Arrow of God, A Man of the People, Girls at War, Beware Soul Brother

Tewfik Al-Hakim fate of a cockroach

T.M. Aluko-One man, one Matchete, One man, One Wife, Kinsman and Foreman, Chief and Honouraboe Minister, His Worshipful Majesty

Elechi Amadi-The Concubine, The Great Ponds, Sunset in Biafra, The Slave

Jared Angira-Silent Voices

I.N.C. Aniebo-The anonymity of Sacrifice, the Journey Within

Ayi Kwei Armah-The Beautiful Ones are not Yet born, Fragments, Why are we so blessed, The healers

Bediako Asare -rebel

Kofi Awooner-this Earth, my Brother

Francis Bebey-Agatha Moudios Son, The Ashanti Doll

Mongo Beti-Mission to Kala, King Lazarus, the Poor

 

 

 

Invisible President #1: This Weeks State of The State Address From Governor Snyder

Invisible President:  This Weeks State of the State Address from Governor Snyder

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

In this week’s televised address “State of The State” by Governor Rick Snyder, the Governor highlighted that Michigan’s citizens were “coming home” for new opportunities and peaceful natural living after leaving for jobs and schools in other states. Michigan leads in the nation in terms of a sought after place to live. Michigan residents are coming home with fresh ideas and international experience, speaking multiple languages and with a taste for fine culinary and finery in general.  Local publications like “Hour Detroit,” offer a glossy version of the local restaurant and culinary “treasure trove” in Michigan.

Michigan continues to be a down to earth place to live-good, simple, living-medium sized cities not so small that you easily become “the talk of the town.” Michigan is “The humble state.”

The Detroit area out skirts have good schools for culinary including Schoolcraft College’s culinary program for those en route to becoming a master chef.  Michigan is a good place for independent international grocery and to open a restaurant.

Michigan shined as a new hub for manufacturing where even a coupon printing factory may generate millions of dollars. Manufacturing is attracting internationals to Michigan from countries like Albania, China and the Middle East.  University of Michigan has been compared to Harvard and was recently ranked in a number one position.

Michigan for multiple reasons such as manufacturing, good schools and The Great Lakes  warmly welcomes a large Asian population primarily Chinese to the state.   There are many loved  Indian, Korean and Vietnamese Restaurants and groceries.   Africans have flocked to eastern hubs and all over. International groceries have sprung up in every strip including Kasoa Market, an African grocery that sells things like mackerel in chili sauce, fufu, gari, plantain and guava juice. There is also Hua Xing Grocery, a large Chinese market with a whole aisle of noodles, tea break snacks, sake, teas, dumplings, Chinese vegetables and fresh fish.

It’s possible to enjoy  authentic and fresh Mexican cheeses and creams from “Dos Hermanos” Grocery on Michigan Avenue in Ypsilanti. In Michigan we are not talking about “borders” we are welcoming our international family.  Various citizens of Michigan are hoping to make this State “inhospitable to racism” and the contrary to promote a harmonious and loving melting pot.

Marijuana is  legal with an ID card in Michigan and has attracted many new businesses and eliminated a lot of crime. There are lots of places for outdoor camping and marinas.  The primary fruit crop that does well in Michigan is apples.  There are still lots of farms and rural areas and country living in general.

New business has been attracted to Michigan with the opening of breweries, Amazon in Livonia, The Google internet browser and search engine, the automotive industry and many others assuming and unassuming such as myriad cider mills, the non-profit sector or creative industry. Michigan enjoys a nice healthy mix that is part industrial and part natural, which can be an ideal.

Governor Snyder honored the military and spoke of “sharp shooters” and honored promising youth activism including from East Lansing High School who gave him “elevator pitches” in a recent meeting.

During his term Governor Snyder created several “commissions” to look at “best practices” internationally that may benefit Michigan’s infrastructure.  Very low unemployment and problems such as the Flint water crisis were well managed and cities like Flint are enjoying “resilience” as was written by the Community Foundation of Greater Flint.

The Governor said “up to third grade one is learning to read” then after third grade (they are utilizing reading) and “reading to learn.” Snyder is looking at issues involved with children’s education.

The Governor is working on a long term goal around community building hoping that like a contagion successful communities will support and model for each other.

A few days after the “State of the State” some Michigan women headed to Washington D.C. for a Woman’s March on Washington including owner of “All Sewn Up Sewing School,” Anne Reinstein. Even feminist and woman’s issues are being discussed in many homes and businesses. Feminist theory classes have heated up at Eastern Michigan University in the philosophy department where Ombudsman’s were contacted and grade grievances were filed.

Detroit continues to flex where new charismatic leaders such as L. Brooks Patterson are spotlighting Oakland County’s achievements in magazines.  Some think bankruptcy may have been a “smoke screen” planted to shield Detroit from rising internationalism and growing population counts in hip neighborhoods like Hamtramck.

Michigan’s educational institutions are leading in terms of preparing technological leaders at schools like University of Michigan Dearborn with good medical schools and schools of engineering or Lawrence Tech that has good architectural engineering programs and promotes fields like “computational biology” or Data Mining entered through its mathematics and computer science program door.   Michigan’s manufacturing has always attracted good engineering programs at Michigan State University, University of Michigan and Lawrence Tech, and still others at Michigan Technological University in the upper peninsula-in a natural reserved area-where the Governor is based.