Up to Snuff #136: Allegorical, Parody & Satire, sub themes

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Allegorical-Expression by means of symbolic fictional figures and action of truths or generalizations about human existence.

Parody-A literary or musical work in which the style of an author or work is closely imitated for comic effect or in ridicule.

Satire-A literary work holding up vices and follies to ridicule or scorn, trenchant wit, irony or sarcasm used to expose and discredit vice or folly.

Up to Snuff #134: Book list Literary Theory & books that support theory #1

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Literary Theory will need a scaffolding of supporting books

Upon which all of one’s analysis will have a basis

Or connection

Upon which to stand

Some books will be relevant to specifically this target of support

Wordsworth, William. “Preface to Lyrical Ballads.” Famous Prefaces., Bartelby.com

Plato Republic

Aristotle, “Poetics”

Victor Shklovsky

Roman Jakobson

Victor Erlich  Russian Formalism History-Doctrine

Yuri Tynyanov

John Crowe Ransom  The New Criticism

I.A. Richards

William Empson

T.S. Eliot

Allen Tate

Cleanth Brooks

R.S. Crane   Critics and Criticism:  Ancient and Modern

Elder Olson

Norman Maclean

W.R. Keast

Wayne C. Booth   The Rhetoric of Fiction

Sigmund Freud

Carl Jung  Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious

Maud Bodkin   Archetypal Patterns in Poetry

Bettina Knapp   Music, Archetype and the Writer

Richard Sugg  Jungian Literary Criticism

Peter Rabinowitz   Before Reading

Stanley Fish   Is there a text in this class?  The Authority of Interpretive Communities

Elizabeth Freund  The Return of the Reader, Reader-Response Criticism

Norman Holland   The Dynamics of Literary Response, 1968

Louise Rosenblatt

Wolfgang Iser, The Implied Reader, The Implied Reader:  Patterns of Communication in Prose Fiction from Bunyan to Beckett, 1974

Hans Robert Jauss

Derrida

Immanual Kant

Rene Descartes

John Locke

Friedrich Nietzsche

Ihab Hassan The Dismemberment of Orpheus

Dadaism

John Fowles The French Lieutenant’s Woman

Naked Lunch William S. Burroughs

Roland Barthes

Gargantua and Pantegruel

Deleuze and Guattari   Rhizome

Jean-Francois Lyotard  The Postmodern Condition

Michele Foucault The Foccault Reader

Stephen Toulmin Cosmopolis

Martin Heidegger  Basic Writings

Paul Cilliers   Complexity and Postmodernity

Post Modernity-  The Local/Global Context

Angela Carter-Burning your boats, stories for 1962-1993

Kathy Acker-  Blood and Guts in High School

Paul Auster-  City of Glass

Lynne Tillman- Haunted Houses

David Wojnarowicz-The Waterfront Journals

Charles Sanders Peirce

Ferdinand de Saussure   Course in General Linguistics

Claude Levi-Strauss  The Elementary Structure of Kinship, “The Structural Study of Myth”

Northrop Frye- Anatomy of Criticism:  Four Essays

Noam Chomsky Syntactic Structures, Aspects of the Theory of Syntax

Roland Bathes-Critical Essays, Mythologies

Umberto Eco-The Role of the Reader

Michel Foucault The Order of Things, The Archeology of Human Sciences

Clifford Geertz  The Interpretation of Cultures, Deep Play, Notes on the Balinese Cock Fight

Hayden White, Metahistory, The Politics of Historical Interpretation, Discipline and De-Sublimation

Stephen Greenblatt- Renaissance Self Fashioning:  From More to Shakepeare

Pierre Bourdieu- Outline of a Theory of Practice, Homo Academicus, The Field of Cultural Production

Luce Irigaray  Speculum of the Other Woman

Helene Cixous-The Laugh of the Medusa

Laura Mulvey-Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema

Michel Foucault-The History of Sexuality

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick-Epistemology of the Closet

Lee Edelman-Homographesis

Michael Warner

Judith Butler-Imitation and gender in subordination

Mary Wollstonecraft-A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Simone de Beauvoir-Le Deuxieme Sexe

Julia Kristeva-About Chinese Women

Elaine Showalter-A Literature of Their Own, Toward Feminist Poetics

Deborah E. McDowell, New Directions for Black Feminist Criticism

Alice Walker, In search of Our Mothers Gardens

Lillian S. Robinson, Treason Our Text, Feminist Challenges to the Literary Canon

Camille Paglia-Sexual Personae, The Androgyne in Literature and Art

Lois Tyson-Critical Theory Today- A User Friendly Guide

Daniel Defoe Robinson Crusoe

Chinua Achebe Things Fall Apart

Ngugi wa Thiong’o-the River Between

Edward Said  Orientalism, Culture and Imperialism

Kamau Brathwaite, The History of the Voice

Gayatri Spivak, In Other Worlds, Essays in Cultural Politics

Dominick LaCapra-The Bounds of Race:  Perspectives on Hegemony and Resistance

Homi Bhabha-The Location of Culture

 Sembene Ousmane-God’s Bits of Wood

Ruth Prawer Jhabvala-Heat and Dust

Buchi Emecheta-The Joys of Motherhood

Keri Hulme-The bone People

Robertson Davies-What’s Bred in the bone

Kazuo Ishiguro-The remains of the day

Bharati Mukherjee-Jasmine

Jill Ker Conway-The Road from Coorain

Helena Norberg-Hodge- Ancient Futures:  Learning form Ladakh

Michael Ondaatje-The English Patient

Gita Mehta-A River Sutra

Arundhati Roy-The God of Small Things

Patrick Chamoiseau-Texaco

Lawrence Buell The Environmental Imagination:  Thoreau, Nature Writing and the Formation of American Culture

Charles Bressler-Literary an Introduction to Theory and Practice

Cheryll Glotfelty and Harold Fromm-The Ecocriticism Reader, Landmarks in Literary Ecology

Greg Garrard-Ecocriticism

Donna Haraway-A Cyborg Manifesto, Science, Technology, and Socialist-Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century

ISLE-Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and the Environment (Journal)

Joseph Makus-The Comedy of Survival, Literary Ecology and a Play Ethic

Leo Marx-The Machine in the Garden, Technology and the Pastoral Ideal in America

Raymond Williams-The Country and the City

Edward Abbey  Desert Solitaire

Appalachian Wilderness

The Monkey Wrench Gang

Mary Hunter Austin

The Land of Little Rain

Rachel Carson

Silent Spring

Aldo Leopold

A Sand Country Almanac and sketches Here and there

Johon Muir

A thousand mile walk to the gulf

Studies in the Sierra

Henry David Thoreau

Walden, or Life in the woods

Williams Wordworth

Lyrical Ballads, with a Few Other Poems

Lyrical Ballads, with Other Poems

Delgado, Richard and Jean Stefancic.  Critical Race Theory:  An introduction

Bell, Derrick, Who’s Afraid of Critical Race Theory

Crenshaw, Kimberle   et al. Critical Race Theory:  The Key Writings that Formed the Movement

Davis, Peggy  Law as Micoaggression

Gates, Henry Louis   The Signifying Monkey  A Theory of African American Literary Criticism

Harris, Cheryl  Whiteness as Property, Harvard Law Review 106.8 (1993)

Hooks, Bell  Feminist Theory, From the Margins to the Center

Lipsitz, George  The Possessive Investment in Whiteness, How white people profit from identity politics

Spillers, Hortense  Mama’s Baby, Papa’s Maybe An American Grammar Book

Williams, Patricia   Seeing a Color blind Future:  the Paradox of Race

Contours of Ableism  by Fiona Kumari Campbell

Concerto for the Left Hand   By Michael Davidson

Enforcing Normalcy   Lennard J. Davis

The Birth of the Clinic and Madness and Civilization  Michel Foucault

Extraordinary Bodies and Staring, How we look,  Rosemarie Garland Thomson

Feminist, Queer, Crip   Alison Kafer

Bodies of Modernism  Maren Tova Linett

Narrative Prosthesis  and Cultural Locations of Disability  Sharon L. Snyder and David T. Mitchell

A Disability History of the United States  Kim Nielsen

Aesthetic Nervousness  Ato Quayson

Deafening Modernism  Rebecca Sanchez

Disability Aestehics and disability Theory  Tobin Siebers

The Question of Access  Tanya Titchkosky

Berube, Michael  Disability and Narrative

Davis, Lennard  Constructing Normalcy, The Bell Curve and the Invention of the Disabled Body in the Nineteenth Century  The Disabilities Studies Reader

Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie   Integrating Disability, Transforming Feminist Theory, Disabilities Studies Reader

Mitchell, David and Sharon Snyder, Narrative Prosthesis:  Disability and Dependencies of Discourse, U of Michigan P, 2000

Shakespeare, Tom, The Social Model of Disability   The Disability Studies Reader

Karl Marx- Communist Manifesto

Das Kapital

Consciousness Derived From Material Conditions  from the German Ideology

On Greek Art in its time – from a Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy

Leon Trotsky-Literature and Revolution

Georg Lukacs-Ideology of Modernism

Walter Benjamin-The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

Theodor Adorno

Louis Althusser-Reading Capital

Terry Eagleton-Marxism and Literary Criticism, Criticism and Ideology

Frederic Jameson-Marxism and Form, The Political Unconscious

Jurgen Habermas-The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity

Lacan

Sandra Gilbert

Susan Gubers

Ezra Pound Poet Critic

I.A. Richards Practical Critic

William Empson’s 7 Types of Ambiguity

Yvor Winters the Morality of Poetry

Cleanth Brooks Robert Penn Warrens  Understanding Poetry

Allen Tates  Miss Early and the Bibliographer

John Crowe Ransoms The New Criticism

Cleanth Brooks The Well Wrought Urn

T.S. Eliot The Sacred Wood

William K. Wimsatt

Monroe Beardsleys the Intentional Fallacy

T.S. Eliot Wasteland

Animal Farm

The flame and the Flower

Kathleen E. Wood

The Great Gatsby

 Pride and Prejudice

Black Beauty

Treasure Island

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Tolkien

The book theif Markus Zusak

Man’s Art Speigelman

Macbeth

All the light we can see Anthony Doerr

Mikhail Baktin

Franz Kafka

They Flee From one  Anne Boleyns

A Valediction Forbidding Mourning John Dome

Kepler Galileo

Werner Herzog

The New Criticism and Contemporary Literary Theory

Praising it New:  The Best of the New Criticism

Majorie Levinson  New Formalism and Analysis of Text First

Kenneth Burke et all Moral Readings

Reason and Emotion

R.P. Blackmer

William Wimsatt

Monroe Beardsley

I.A. Richards  What do they mean who do they know analysis

William Epson   7 Types of Ambiguity

Andrew Marvell

Understanding Poetry

Horation Ode

Cranwells Return from Ireland

Kafka Franz  The Metamorphosis

Frantz Fanon  Black Skin, White Masks

Angelo Ancheta

Andrew Hacker, Two Nations, Black and White Separate, Hostile, Unequal

Ishmael Reed,  O.J. Bias Black and White

Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil disorders

Gary Y. Okihiro, Margins and Mainstreams, Asians in American History and Culture

Frank H. Wu Neither Black nor white Asian Americans and Affirmative Action

Up to Snuff #133: What is Literature?

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

When looking at literature and qualifying writings or looking generally for “literariness,” what is literature?

What often qualifies as literature is the use of formal elements such as literary devices.  It may appear that it was made for teaching or exemplifying in its use of literary device, such as that of Shakespeare and the example of alliteration.  Another trait that literature has is its attention to its own form, a kind of “self- consciousness.”  Literature is said to be something then, that is meant to be read closely.  It is also something meant to be “laboriously analyzed.”  Text is said to me made of “forms, words and devices.”  Literature is meant for a closeness that is necessary for understanding.  Literature is supposed to be what makes great text.  All of the elements are supposed to work together to make its text whole.  Comparison in literature is supposed to measure up to literary canon.  Where the canon is what has been accepted as great literature, and is as solemn, principled, or holy as “bread and wine.”  Canon was meant to raise the bar and create a standard.  It may come from the old medieval war cannons and the idea of “living under rule.” 

Works cited:

Lit 200 Module Two Lecture Notes, Southern New Hampshire University, 2021

Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition

Up to Snuff #132: Book List, Important Books in Publishing

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Ted Talks The Official Guide to Public Speaking

The Plant, Stephen King

Sociological Imagination, Wright Mills

The Search for Anna Fisher

John Updike

Ha Jinn

Ryszard Kapuscinski

Our Bodies, Ourselves

Why Johnny Can’t Read, Rudolph Fleschs

Dr. Seuss

Gentlemen’s Agreement

South Pacific  (film)

To Kill a Mockingbird

Diary of Anne Frank

Childhood & Society, Eric Erickson

Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, Alfred Kinsey

The Conscience of a Conservative, Barry Goldwater

The Lonely Crowd

The Hidden Persuaders

The Organization Man

Silent Spring, Rachel Carsons

Ecommerce, Paul Samuelson

*** (True Classic) A History of the Book in America Volume 5:  The Enduring Book:  Print Culture in Postwar America, David Paul Nord

Judy Blume

Up to Snuff #131: Vocabulary List #15

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Pithy

Miffed

Hubris

Syuzhet

Fabula

Misfired

Squander

Precious

Germaine

Commodity

Tyranny

Wallow

Epithets

Endearing

Extravagant

Saucy

Witty

Free rein

Amorous

Impulses

Sappy

Caveat

Smitten

Duty

Drudgery

Crinolines

Hooped Skirts

Social unguent

Digressive

Ample

Brief

Subtext

Convey

Vigorous

Authentic

Doggedly

Cherished

Avid

Asunder

Intoxicating

Turmoil

Articulate

Cataclysm

Inertia

Mellower

Misconstrue

Maidenly

Restive

Remnant

Affirmation

Bears me up

Marguerite

Kid glove

Beloved

Caress

Scantily

Verge

Ascendancy

Commiserated

Paraphernalia

Talismanic

Incantatory

A thousand torment

Exalted

Yearn

Fervor

Coo

Confers

Pungent

Drama

Convincingly

Lain

Lacewing

Studiously grammatical

Dwell

Reflective

Relentlessly

Cheerful

Inclination

Parceling

Reciprocal proportion

Staunch

Allies

Sumptuous

Ribbed

Snappy

Regimen

Impediment

Propriety

Formalities

Correspondents

Fire off

Resuscitate

Encapsulate

Affectionate

Dacha

Stiff

Insincere

Fluid

Mocking

Aroused

Paint

Macabre

Lampoon

Wicked

Feeble

Allopathic

Homeopathic

What a pickle she got in

Deign

Vulgar

Disarm

Delight

Dubious

Sprightly

Attractive

Quincy

Animal

Pinch-penny

Dollop

Sell-irony

Natural

Earth shaking

Indefatigable

Exertions

Anxious affection

Beloved

Epistolary

Eager

Standard

Vibrant

Vigor

Brisk

Venial

Preamble

Courage

Jolt

Amusing

Prosaic

Bulwark

Candor

Quick silver

Cordiality

Missives

Luxuriate

Disposable

Sentiment

Earnest

Moody

Quipped

Languishing

Strident

Lovely

Mantel

Awkward

Paradoxical

Bungle

Soothing

Decompress

Boon

Quill Pens

Ink pots

Perched

Fancy

Fanciful

Ladle

Salubrious

Commander

Fuss

Charmed

Correspondence

Accoutrements

Modicum

Exudes

Unassailable

Ephemeral

Distressing

Blip

Faith

Grace

Vulnerable

Condolence

Illegible

Courtesy

Impersonal

Indulging

Luxurious

Calligraphy

Watercolors

Heirloom

Redolent

Family Crest

Embossing

Engraving

Customary

Inlet

Inimitable

Irresistible

Delight

Paragon

Commonplace

Eccentric

Provoking

Enchant

Lavished

Immobility

Corporeal

Spectral

Grasp

Efficient

Caches

Penned

Bear

Charms

Flourished

Ordinary

Reforms

Circulated

Perceptive

Nonetheless

Agreeable

Contemporaries

Fertile

Flowering

Rank

Fanny

Veritable

Splendid

Thrive

Worth

Insuperable

Obstacles

Harried

Pace

Meditative

Clutter

Laboring

Refresh

Knack

Improvisation

Repositories

Informality

Gratuitous

Moral

Cask

Gratifying

Instinctive

Sympathy

Fraught

Extraordinary
Vivid

True

Uncork

Dispensed

Gibberish

Buncum

Up to Snuff #130 Mantra or Guidance, Basic Plan

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Work towards something as a writer and plant something at the back of your mind that is your direction.  It can be as if a mantra or north star.  It can be something that you “ask” for.

  1. Clear, simple understandable and precision.

Ask for clarity.  Ask to be clearly understood, which gives you power.  Rid yourself of passive voice.  Good for a beginning writer. Proverb, leanness. Economy of words.  Proper, short, direct sentences. Concise. Straight shooter.  Rid your writing of problems.  Carefully observe your words. Ask for precision.  Good subject and verb.  Good diction. Memorable.  Clear mind and speech.

2. Description and Finesse

General good taste. To sweeten. Romantic. Loving eyes. Humane. Precise description. Rich description. Journal or note taking of descriptions of ideas or experiences or places or people. Acute senses. As if in your absence this shall stand. This is the historical document or after party. The peel away or manifestation. The words of a gentlemen or lady, or man or woman. With reverence, with quality. Worthy. Authoritative. Dignified. Well researched. Sometimes round, sometimes blending into the background. Those who give respect, get respect.

3. Voice

Sometimes an English voice is good. A mature and wise voice. Channel voices. Avoid all slang in favor of more tasteful and decorative language. As classical as possible. Reduce first person writing to more intriguing less self centered options. First person (I) at some venues is not allowed and can sometimes sound immature or selfish. Try different perspectives or narratives. Try improving your speech. Opt for clarity. Use a narrator or employ some device. Reverence. Sacred. Respectful. Again, dignified. A gentlemen or lady, a man or woman. Maturity is so essential to writing. Wisdom is essential to good writing.

4. Value and service

Ask for richness.  Ask for value.  Ask that your writing may serve something specific. Informative. Eg. culturally informative. Giving, gifts. Quality of generosity. Wisdom giving. Offering. Sacred. A treasure. Something like a “Sunday Quin.” Something one will not want to discard. The ultimate give in a piece of writing. The subsequent value. The endowment.

5. Form

Ask for organization. Ask for form. Learn APA, MLA, Chicago.  Learn Basic 5.  Learn to write a good thesis.  Learn some technical writing. Learn how to include or be guided by topic sentences.  Use persuasion to master the use of evidence.  Use boiler plates.  Wrap it up at the end and recap.  Make strong relevant points.

6. Unitary

Work on our vocabulary.  Read dictionaries.  Search for good writing words.  Study pieces of writing.  History to word.  Pairings.  Punctuation.

7. Power

Learn how to condense, learn proverb, learn how to stage, learn how to inspire change, how to manifest abstract ideas, psychology.  Reversals, style, pockets.  Literary device, Literary theory, structuralist. Extract meaning, creation of knowledge and subsequent value.  Learn the study and use of literature.  Extract points from literature to generate new thought. Authoritative. Organize, helm and package finished writings into books etc.  Star maker, editorial.  Branding, headings.  Clear rich, and often rolled up thought, or unfolded thought. Technology.  Teach work on a variety of things/issues.  Be in tune with writings role in knowledge and power to teach.  Write a PHD. Research.  Inferential or data rich.

Up to Snuff #129, Vocabulary List #14, Some Dissertation Writing Words

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Note: Good vocabulary is not unknown words or long words or little bombastic words. Good vocabulary is good writing words. Good vocabulary is the study of language. Good vocabulary is the appreciation of all words, their pairings, their history, and their relative power.

Retrospective

Effectiveness

Questioned

Cannon

Common

Practice

Emphasis

Compliance

Leveraging

Illustrative

Comprehensive

Issues

Context

Ethics

Quality

Rooted

Social Justice

Amorphous

Practitioners

Emerged

Specialists

Mandatory

Voluntary

Estimated

Arena

Checkered

Plethora

Critics

Efforts

Chronicle

Efforts

Chronicle

Draw on

Expense

Explore

Evolution

Tendency

Demographic

Umbrella

Predate

Recognized

Dishonest

Genre

Focus

Enactment

Supplemental

Legislation

Prohibits

Bans

Landmark

Spawned

Barrage

Probable cause

Remedies

Mandate

Anti-discriminatory

Consent

Decree

In response

Alleged

Costly

Embarrassing

Voluntarily

Implemented

Imparting

Rank and file

Notable

Exceptions

Strictly

Compliance

Litigation

Avoidance

Moral

Imperative

Espouse

Philosophy

Causes

Support

Publication

Notwithstanding

Litany

Case studies

Participants

Recitations

Ponder

Length

Periodic

Refresher

Signatures

Recipients

Historically

Underrepresented

Minorities

Equitably

Exclusion

Preferential

Offended

Resonate

Transform

Organizational

Culture

Policy

Practices

Environments

Allow

Earnestly

Inclusive

Key drivers

Retreat

Intensity

Enforcement

Stalled

Deregulation

Intensive

Fine-grained

Regulation

Representation

Latitude

Scrutiny

Pressing concerns

Offshore

Competition

Scaled back

Cost cutting

Mandatory

Managerial

Content

Objective

Assimilate

Training

Assumption

Entrants

Efficacy

Theorized

Capabilities

Performance

Influences

Impacting

Lacked

Self Confidence

Talents

Unwelcoming

Contrast

Prevailing

Entrants

Underachieved

Internalized

Stimuli

Reinforcing

Efficacy

Subtle

Control

Stately

Revelation

Seldom

Demographic

Make-up

Comprised

Misinterpreted

Intimidating

Marginal

Ethnic

Relatively

Absolute

Versus

Nonetheless

Shift

Composition

Workforce

Lexicon

Rationale

Industry

Data shifted

Discussions

Comply

Mandates

Assimilate

Homogenous

Paradigm

Survival

Argued

Recruitment

Central

Overwhelming

Plateau

Essential

Mobility

Enabling

Paired

Fundamental

Shift

Incorporating

Valid

Primarily

Fixing

Compound

Consensus

Diluted

Unequal

Adamant

Adversities

Notion

Advantage

Disadvantage

Immutable

Rhetoric

Proclaimed

Confuse

Euphemism

Topics

Attention

Intensity

Confess

Repent

Defensive

Backlash

Reverse

Historic

Alleged

Upheld

Spectrum

Era’s

Watered down

Legitimacy

Correspond

Embraced

Emerge

Implicit

Attitudes

Mindful

Sustained

Exposure

Disappointment

Incremental

Reshaping

Transformational

Slated

Coveted

Juncture

Implicit

Shortcoming

Unavoidable

Tradeoff

Vernacular

Evaluated

Mixture

Cognitive

Experiential

Albeit

Controversial

Adverse

Dubbed

Conducted

Experiments

Subconscious

Bias

Memorable

Transformative

Adjectives

Stereotypes

Facilitators

Descriptors

Insufficient

Adequately

Historical

Sociological

Generalizations

Debriefing

Backfired

Identified

Role plays

Experiential

Exercises

Participants

Simulate

Transformation

Expertise

Constraints

Squeezed

Failure

Grasps

Complex

Unintended

Consequences

Animosity

Interpret

Surmised

Villains

Sensitive

Pressured

Identity group

Misunderstood

Co-workers

Biased

Prejudiced

Relegated

Core

Positioning

Millennium

Earliest

Motivation

Initiatives

Impetus

Foster

Enhance

Tangential

Profitability

Demographics

Endeavors

Shortages

Technically

Fierce

Action based

Value chain

Higher performance

Competent

Discern

Patterns

Effectively

Incorporate

World views

Problem solving

Conflict resolution

Proprietary

Skills

Building

Competencies

Enable

Consistent

Practitioners

Ongoing

Curricula

Robust

Intercultural

Modalities

Assumption

Cross-Culturally

Competent

Premises

Underlying

Integrated

Relevant

Applicable

Phenomenon

Activities

Benchmarks

Assess

Measure

Criteria

Strategies

Chronicles

Respective

Critical

Component

Outsourcing

Encouraged

Dimensions

Up to date

Expansive

Varied

Highlighted

Embedded

Systematically

Top down

Bottom up

Senior level

Accountability

Incentive

Compensation

Domestically

Philosophical beliefs

Imperative

Awareness

Clarifying

Angles

Promotion

Partnering

Buy-in

Inclusion

Sponsoring

Affinity Group

Spirit

Portfolio

Building blocks

Undergo

Self-awareness

Facilitate

Integral

Customized

Additionally

Pioneered

Mentoring

Retention

Approximate

Summarized

Ethnocentric

Ethno-relation

Majority

Minimization

Acceptance

Discern

Devised

Defense

Denial

Adaptation

Clarity

Suitability

Academicians

Composition

Factors

Formal

Correlation

Exemplary

Retention

Attitudes

Prevailing

Heightened

Encompassing

Productivity

Feasible

Statistics

Conduct

Referenced

Overall

Tailors

Geographic

Complexity

Deemed

Vastness

Risk

Multifaceted

Acumen

Counterparts

In depth

Sexual orientation

Cursory

Generational

Furthermore

Approaches

Phase

Nascent

Up to Snuff #128: Book List Mostly with Literary Theory Orientation

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Literary Theory  A Practical Introduction

Mikhail Bakhtin

Wordsworth

Logical Fallacies

Keats

The Knowledge Creating Company Ikujiro Nonaku

Enabling Knowledge George Von Krogh

The Innovators Dilemma When New Technologies  Clayton M. Christensen

Hanon

Chopin

The Seminar      Jacques Lacan

Foucault

Jane Austen

Julie Rivkin

Portrait in Georgia

Cane

Norton Anthology of Theory & Criticism   Vincent Leitch

Tracy Whiting

Metamorphosis Franz Kafka

Think like a monk, train your mind for peace   Jay Shetty

The Seagull Book of Poems

Literary Theory An Anthology Julie Rivkin

The Craft of Research  Wayne C. Booth

Professing Literature Gerald Graff

Mary Klages,  Literary Theory, A Guide for the Perplexed

Mary Klages, Key Terms in Literary Theory

Tacit Learning

Literary Review

Emily Dickinson

Biocentric Worldview  Ludwig Klages

Cosmogenic Reflections Ludwig Klages

Pygmalion George Bernard Shaw

Pratchett’s Women  Unauthorized Essays on Female Characters of the Discworld   

Billy Budd, Bartleby and Other Stories  Herman Melville

Leaves of Grass The Original 1855 Edition  Walt Whitman

The Essential Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson

Literature Unit A guide for Where the Red Fern Grows  Patty Carratello

Literary Theory  Jerry Engleton

Beginning Theory Peter Barry

Literary Theory  Jonathon Culler

The Gothic Order Racial and Social Constructionism in The Literary Imagination

Ruth Bienstock Anolik

The Complete Frankenstein

Othello

Desdemona

Derrida

Lois Lowry The Giver

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Literary Mantels

Wolf Hall Trilogy

Not Writing, Anne Boyer

Garments Against Women,  Anne Boyer

Lucille Clifton

Naomi Shihab Nye

Rachel Mckibbens

Wizard of Oz

Glass Castle  Jenette Wells

Al Young  The Blues Don’t Change New and Selected Poems

Charlie Chaplin  Modern Times

William Blake

Buster Keaton

Herman Melville

Jane Austen

Joseph Conrad

T.S. Eliot

Albert Camus

Gabriel Garcia Marquez

J.D. Salinger

Alice Walker

Cynthia Ozick

Ralph Ellison

Paddy Chayetsky

Brave New World Aldous Huxley

George Orwell 1984

Animal Farm

Up to Snuff #127: Extracting Meaning, Creation of Knowledge, Consequent Value

Extracting Meaning, Creation of Knowledge, Consequent Value

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

I am Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu. A short version or nickname would be FaFa Bonsu.  A Ghanaian American who, resides in Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA. I am a Creative Writing English and Poetry major (CWE.POE).  I have been reading about ideological writing and Marx and recently reading Shakespeare, Edgar Allan Poe, Dorothy Parker, Sophocles-however I would like to get into some new areas.  I have been collecting spiritual literature.  I recently assembled a list of what is included in my spiritual library.  I will for this opportunity select Confucius from a Harvard Classic Reader.  I am aiming to get into some new areas and perhaps look at sacred or religious or sage writings.

What do I know about literary theory?  I am intrigued by the word theory alone.  I wonder what the word theory can imply.  Does it require proof like “justified true belief” or JTB or is it the un-established? Is it to perpetually establish?  If one says art theory versus literary theory, I suppose I want to be more- clear about what is suggested by that terminology.  I would love to write theory but feel still naïve.  If I were to write art theory, what is its approach, or have I already?  Is theory a scaffolding of ideas upon which or with its guidance one may arrive or question or analyze or create? If one may arrive, is it then theory? Theory may be some kind of wise guide. Theory may answer a kind of question, perhaps even how or why? A theory may result in a kind of questioning.  Or does it mean that there are established theories and one’s work becomes the analysis in response to the theories or the work that is derivative of the theories?  So, I guess there are two products, theories, and something else? Both can be written, the theory and the theories subsequent writing.  I enjoy both of those.  Or the art theory and the arts subsequent product and the products criticism.  Then there are three products. Perhaps you have the piece of literature as product one, then the theory laid upon it, then the resulting criticism and even the analysis of the variety of criticism. So, theory may have a trajectory, art and or literary.

What is my understanding of literary theory at this time?  It has to do with value, with the creation and manufacture of meaning itself.  There is at once the literature, whose secondary function may be its interpretation or its context and ultimately its meaning.  The extension of writing is the thought around it-its secondary, and that secondaries building blocks.  But then theory leads you not to take a sip, but a full drink.  Theory then becomes the octopus, the world view, the connecting points that make a defined way of thinking, a kind of enlightenment.   Theory helps you to extract meaning, look at purpose and reasoning or variations. (Klages)  Theory helps a writer to achieve a close reading.  Theory may guide one to look first at emergence, then at context, then conclude with results or relationships (Klages 5).  It can be like a scaffolding that becomes a boilerplate.  What can be impressive is when you extract meaning that becomes world view as in the example of “language, gender, and consciousness” (Klages 5).  Meanings extracted from literature can define movements or be existential.  Literature has left a trail, as if it were archeology or anthropological.  Literary theory then provides one a tool.

Literary Theory is perhaps the most significant factor in giving literature or the field of writing its value.  Extraction of meaning transforms writing into knowledge.  It transforms the entire field into knowledge.

I think you are correct in your estimation about the value behind “how does it mean, what does it produce and what effect does it have on us and the world? ”  It is as if it is one’s duty or task to ascertain the quality, value, meaning, the giving of a piece of literature.  The reasoning is interesting and the desire to learn from it, to grow from it and arrive at a knowledge juncture.  Perhaps certain techniques get you there, then get you there every time.  I suppose it is the scholar that wants to get there at all.

I am intrigued by when you wrote literary theory is whether it is or is not literature. Is that a prize, or bar or distinction, or quality?  Are you protesting that this fine Dystopian novel may for you have equal value? I have writings that I wonder how they will be classified, who is the classifier and what are the terms? What makes up the literary theory that classifies it?

Works Cited:

Klages, Mary. “Literary Theory: A Guide for the Perplexed” Edition 1.  Bloomsbury Publishing 2007-01-23, pp. 1-9