Up to Snuff #65: Three

Up to Snuff #65: Three
By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

The woman at the career office said, “I saw something so beautiful and it was a three.”

“Three,” she said, “could be many things she came to realize.” The initial impression reminded her of the delicacy of a PHD degree’s framing or the helm of an advanced degree or curriculum or a book title or a career choice. The three “style” provided excitement, depth and richness to a helm. After a while the exact writing of her initial impression was lost to her, all that she remembered was this delightful three and came to formulate all the ways in which it could be done or recreated in her own context.

The following represents a list of possible “three” or triple formations in a helm design that may be used to guide a writing, curriculum or degree choice or book research or title or career title. The “Triple Formation of a Helm Design” can represent juxtaposition or perspective for example. A Three design may actually get somewhere unique as if looking at distinct aspects and relationships will give you greater definition. Perhaps you have the benefit from a large number, juxtaposition and a small number that takes only a few aspects, as if advanced knowledge requires that you only “take an aspect.” An aspect and some relationships may be ample provision with which to build and craft a major work, for example, don’t try to take the ocean.

Often when a really great “Triple Formation in a Helm Design” arises one may consider applying it to a PHD degree design. For example when writing an APA Research Proposal or an essay sometimes those things can be expanded upon in later research or formal studies, even PHD studies. What is really special and can be delightful is once a three is transferred to a PHD it can then become the title of one’s career overall. The writer of the three may go on to do research, even for his or her whole life under that helm and design curriculum under that umbrella or with that same three.

Three balls are often juggled and one researcher pointed out that very seldom can people remember 5 items, only up to 4; the mind cannot go in too many directions at once. For example, if you were watching fish in a pond, 3 of them and suddenly many fish joined, you could still likely point out your initial 3 fish. Even if you were watching 4 fish, you might struggle, but could likely still point out your initial 4 fish after all the rest of the fish joined. But 5 fish is nearly impossible. Three may not at once seem significant but it represents a distinct and memorable good frame.

When you get deep into research and all of a sudden your three may acquire incredible depth, richness and originality. You may represent a small group of people in the world looking at that specific area. You may then become an authority on a subject in a field and receive grants, fellowships, speaking invitations and professorship. You may use your three to make significant advancements in the world.

If you write a major helm that has three variables or aspects, each aspect can become a chapter or its own book. When looking at the acceleration of knowledge three may be a number representational of advancement. Whether or not one is immediately enchanted with a three or not they may place it in their back pocket in the event they are guided to advance themselves in knowledge or searching for a way and a how. One may use three’s as if a “pocket game,” for scholars. For many, a three may be a PHD’s dress rehearsal.

A one when used in a helm may be naïve and require further development. A one may be so broad you don’t make a point that is precise enough or evidence based enough via research. A one may need specification, or narrowness or aspects. A one may be too general and inappropriate for a research based PHD. A Two when used in a helm may require further precision and honing in on subject matter. A two may require greater dimensionality or also greater development for a research based PHD.

What may also be nice when crafting a three, for use in one’s career, may be to survey pre-existing course helms, in the department in which you wish to teach. A savvy researcher may wish to become part of a family of classes-blend in- and whenever possible have something fresh to offer. Three’s generally turn into classes.

Three’s require cleanliness, maturity and to be academic. Three’s are a nice preface to formal research and inferential writing often associated to later advanced studies and PHD’s.

Where can you use a “Triple Formation in a Helm Design?”
1. PHD Degree Design
2. Advanced Degree
3. Curriculum Design or class
4. Book Research
5. Book title
6. Career Choice
7. An Essay
8. Research Proposal
9. A journalism article
10. Teaching Assignment

How can “Triple Formations in a Helm Design” be structured?
1. Subject, Place, Time Period
2. Perspective 1, Perspective 2, Perspective 3
3. From the World, Nation, and Citizens
4. Art, Culture, Ideas
5. People, Subject, Time Period eg. African Sculpture in 2018
6. Three ideas from the streets of Japan, 1, 2, 3
7. Major Helm 1,2,3, and Variable 1, variable2, variable 3
8. Literature, Poetry and Early Writing Experimentation
9. The Achievement of Quality, Problem Solving and Ethics in the Workplace
10. Subject 1, Subject 2, Juxtaposition

Up to Snuff: Back Cover

“Up to Snuff” was something said to Ms. Osei-Bonsu by a newspaper in Chicago as a rookie getting into journalism young.  What “Up to Snuff” came to be for her later was the design of a “ladder” in writing, to climb up and grow as a writer by teaching herself and to use that research to be a wise guide for other writers.  “The writing education I longed for did not exist yet,” so Ms. Osei-Bonsu became one of the pioneers of it.  The challenge was how do you really thoroughly teach a writer to be “wielding” and instill a deep talent for the field?  Up to Snuff came to be a column on the www.revolvingstream.com  blog/database that is planned for publication as a print edition text book for use in schools around the world.  The ultimate goal for the “Up to Snuff” column and book is to found “The Snuff School of Writing,” based on the research from the book.

Things discovered while compiling “Up to Snuff,” were that a writer needs lots of book lists; a writer needs to be well read and should develop a private library.  A writer needs “templates” for many different kinds of writing. A writer needs a good desk top reference book list.  A writer needs to study syntax.  A writer needs to know about conventionality in writing.  A writer needs to test their range.  A writer needs to use precise words.  A writer needs wisdom.  A writer, especially a writing teacher, should study in a variety of programs and even engage in interdisciplinary studies for a broader knowledge base from which to write. With Social Science or research based writing or “data rich” writing or academic writing are all very good ways of achieving sophisticated work.  Creative writing may benefit from tested techniques such as taking a sampling or writing non-stop.  A writer can plan as a basis for later books, crafting dynamic PHD’s or dissertation research or advanced studies to become an authority on a subject area.

Ms. Osei-Bonsu is studying in two interdisciplinary programs at Eastern Michigan University and at the Vermont Military School, Norwich University.   She studied design at Central Saint Martin’s College of Art And Design in London.  Ms. Osei-Bonsu has written for three newspapers including Afrique Newsmagazine where she was an arts columnist.  She received an Irene Little Wallace Award from the Dept. of English Literature at EMU.  She got started in writing with an informal audit of a personal essay class at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York where she was formerly on staff.   Ms. Osei-Bonsu is the author of two books of poetry including, “Magic 8 and the Bone Marrow Sucker,” and “The Pearl Reader,” which are available on www.trafford.com and www.amazon.com.