Up to Snuff#64: Poetry Breadcrumb Search

Up to Snuff #64: Poetry Breadcrumb Search

Compiled by Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Poetry-“Metrical writing, verse, the productions of a poet:  poems, writing that formulates a concentrated imaginative awareness of experience in language chosen and arranged to create a specific emotional response through meaning, sound and rhythm, something likened to poetry esp. beauty of expression, poetic quality or aspect, the ___of dance.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, pg 956)

Poetry-“A metrical composition produced or embellished by creative imagination, utterance in song, poems collectively.” (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Poet Laureate-“A poet honored for achievement, a poet appointed for life by an English sovereign as a member of the royal household and formerly expected to compose poems for court and national occasions, a poet appointed annually by the U.S. Library of Congress as a consultant and typically involved in the promotion of poetry, one regarded by a country or region as its most eminent or representative poet.”  “Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, pg 956)

Prose-“Ordinary spoken or written language, unmetrical composition:  to write or translate in prose, not metrical prosaic or tedious.” (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Prose-“Straightforward, being in prose, to turn forward, the ordinary language people use in speaking or writing, a literary medium distinguished from poetry by its greater irregularity and variety of rhythm and its closer correspondence to the patterns of everyday speech.”(Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Prosaic-“Written in prose.”  (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Pro se-“On one’s own behalf to proceed “pro se” without an attorney or a prose-cuter.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Prose-May be the writing that has yet to be translated to meter that may require a “pro”. AO

Sonnets-“Latin Sonus sound, French old Occitan sonnet =little song, a fixed verse form of Italian origin consisting of 14 lines that are typically 5 foot iambics rhyming according to a prescribed theme, also poem in this pattern. “ (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, pg 1190)

Iambic or Iamb or Iambus-“A metrical foot consisting of one short syllable followed by one long syllable or of one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, pg 614)

Iambic-“A satirical poem in iambic verse.” (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Iambus-“A metrical foot consisting of two syllables of which the first is short and the second is long (u-) or in accentual versification, a foot of two syllables in which the stress accent falls on the second syllable (u’)”  (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Iambic-in “Euripides,” thought of also  as “of the lamb” or smooth, soft or refined or I am two or I am two see, shepherds wool, or woo all (poetry), love or marriage, or used to describe wine, lover, dancer, singer  etc.  AO

Iambic Pentameter-

Satire-“A species of poetry or prose in which vice and folly are held up to ridicule by sarcasm, burlesque, and parody, mocking, critical humor. “ (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Satire-“Satura dish of mixed ingredients, satur well fed, akin to satis enough, a literary work holding up human vices and follies to ridicule or scorn, trenchant wit, irony, or sarcasm used to expose and discredit vice or folly.  Synonym is sarcastic.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Triolets-“Clover leaf, a poem or stanza of eight lines in which the first line is repeated as the fourth and seventh and the second line as the eighth with a rhyme scheme of ABaAabAB” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Odes-“To sing, akin to Greek aude voice, a lyric poem, marked by exaltation of feeling and style, varying length of line, the complexity of stanza forms” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Odes-“A poem fit to be chanted or sung and usually in a dignified style” (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Stanza –“Stay, abode, room, stantia stay more at stance, a division of a poem consisting of a series of lines arranged together in a usually recurring pattern of meter and rhyme: strophe, stanzaic” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Stanza-“A number of lines or verses connected with and adjusted to each other, usually ending in a pause, part of a poem containing every variation of measure in the poem.” (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Strophe-“Stro fe, that part of  a song or dance in the ancient Greek drama performed by the chorus while turning from the right to the left, a stanza.” (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Strophe-“Act of turning, to turn to twist, a rhythmic system composed of two or more lines repeated as a unit, esp. such a unit recurring in a series of strophic units, stanza, the movement of the classical Greek chorus while turning from one side to the other of the orchestra, the part of a Greek choral ode sung during the strophe of the dance.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Strophic-“Of a song, using same music for successive stanzas, compare through composed.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Verse-“Turning, to turn,  a line of metrical writing, metrical language, metrical writing, distinguished from poetry esp. by its lower level of intensity, poetry, poem, a body of metrical writing (as of a period or country), stanza, one of the short divisions into which a chapter of bible is traditionally divided.”(Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Verse-“A line of a definite meter or rhythm; stanza; poetry; short division of any composition, especially of the chapters.”  (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Blank Verse-“Unrhymed iambic lines of five feet each” (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Heroic Verse-“Rhymed iambic lines of five feet each” (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Free Verse-“Verse whose meter is irregular in some respect or whose rhythm is not metrical” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Onomatopoeia-“The formation of words to resemble the sounds made by the thing signified as buzz, a bee, tick-tick, a watch, the use of words so formed or the word itself.” (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Onomatopoeia-“The naming of a thing or action by a vocal imitation of the sound associated with it (as buzz, hiss), the use of words whose sound suggests the sense.” ( Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Onomastics-“The science or study of the origins and forms of words esp. as used in a specialized field, the science or study of the origin and forms of proper names of persons or places, the system underlying the formation and use of words esp. for proper names or of words used in a specialized field eg. onomastician, onomatology.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Villanelle– “A chiefly French verse form running on two rhymes and consisting typically of five tercets and a quatrain in which the first and third lines of the opening tercet recur alternately at the end of the other tercets and together as the last two lines of the quatrain.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Tercet-“A unit or group of three lines of verse, one of the 3 line stanzas in terza rima, one of the two groups of three lines forming the sestet in an Italian sonnet.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Terza rima-

Sestet-“A stanza or poem of six lines, the last six lines of an Italian sonnet.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Sestina-“A lyrical fixed form consisting of six 6 line usu. Unrhymed stanzas in which the end words of the first stanza recur as end words of the following five stanzas in a successively rotating order and as the middle and end of words of three verses of the concluding tercet.”  (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Abecedarian-“Of or relating to the alphabet, alphabetically arranged, rudimentary.”  (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Plays-“Plays or to please, to make believe, to engage in theatrical or insincere behavior, to put on a performance, to act in the character or part of, to perform or act the part of as in the fool, to pretend to engage in the activities of. “ (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Vignette-“Originally an ornament representing vine leaves, tendrils and grapes such as those with which capital letters in old manuscripts were decorated:  hence flowers head and tail pieces in printed books, any picture not enclosed within a definite border, in general any delicate picture or word picture.” (The Consolidated Webster Multi-Pictured Encyclopedic Dictionary)

Vignette– “A running ornament (as of vine leaves, tendrils and grapes) put on or just before a title page or at the beginning or end of a chapter; also: a small decorative design or picture so placed, a short descriptive literary sketch, a brief incident or scene (as in a play or movie), to describe briefly.” (Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Court-

Court Jester-

The Fool-

What’s on the table of poetry are syllables, breath, song, lyrical, musical score, numbered, lettered, observed,  the early experiments in language

The most comprehensive write up I have found on poetry is on Wikipedia

 

 

Happy Holidays and Gift Giving Season! Books by Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Happy Holidays!

What makes a wonderful gift for the season are books by author/poet Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu.

To order “The Pearl Reader” and “Magic 8 and The Bone Marrow Sucker,” two delightful collections of poems by Ghanaian-American poet, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu, see below links.  Available from the website, or the publisher on trafford.com or from Amazon.com or Chapters in Indigo in Canada and on Barnes and Noble online. Enter your contact information at www.magic8book.com to receive future notices about upcoming book releases.

Magic 8 & the Bone Marrow Sucker:

https://www.amazon.com/Magic-Bone-Marrow-Sucker-Collected/dp/1490766499/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500068880&sr=8-1&keywords=9781490766492

http://www.trafford.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-001047266

www.magic8book.com

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/Afua+Osei+Bonsu

The Pearl Reader:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1490783482/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500069192&sr=8-1&keywords=9781490783482

http://www.trafford.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-001049410

www.thepearlreader.com

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-pearl-reader-afua-serwah-osei-bonsu/1126751544?ean=9781490783482

 

 In Canada:

https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-CA/home/search/?keywords=Afua%20Serwah%20Osei-Bonsu

 

Coming in August 2018 is a collection of poetry titled “Value to Man.”

Up to Snuff #49 A Description of Poetry

Up to Snuff #49 A Description of Poetry

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

 

Something loaded

Primed

Shaped

Refined

Precise

Framed

Beautified

Something with roots

Something lean and meaty

“A button” as if on a computer that controls a larger work or function

Something that unlocks

A small that may transfer into a larger work

A large or “body of research” that can be broken into small pieces or even variables that become poems

A method of writing many things with “small pieces” that unfold, eg. a book or chapter that starts from a poem as common literary practice

An idea, something of value that is “caught” or “captured” in a moment and framed as itself or for later enlargement or extension

Poetry may be fundamental in a “development session”, captures may be small bites that relate to research and are intended for contemplation or greater purposes, or simply to document a thought, experience or observation, thinkers may utilize poetry often as building blocks both literary and intellectual

To utilize thumbnails to map out series of poems or related ideas or sequential ideas

To collect scenic poems by sampling or writing non- stop or with description

Collecting sensual ideas like sounds, colors, smells, or general descriptions or onomatopoeia within a framework, eg. To precisely describe a color or condition-eg. “A little browner than watermelon” or to transport or to take with

Poetry may be somewhat derived from personages who were heavily engaged in onomatopoeia like Edgar Allan Poe

Poetry benefits from muses, or loves or studies or observation

Poems may “set the tone” within a writing when used similar to a dedication in a book or at the start of a chapter in a book

Poems may work as a “knowledge builder” something by which one builds themself in a scholarly fashion

Poems may connect to art works, or books, or films or songs or even companies

Poems may illustrate ideas or actions or become activism

Poems are sometimes naturalist, or romantic in many ways or existential, or covering events in one’s day to day life or travels

Eg. A romantic poem may engage a lily and a breast analogy

Poems may become historically relevant or having bearing on a particular era eg. Presidents hire Poet Laureates with aim to fame a country or a nation or their term in leadership

Poems are sometimes dramatic and written for oration, eg. A poem may be sung or recited in special ways eg. I once heard a poet (AG) recite while singing, “Don’t smoke! Don’t smoke! Just suck! Just suck!”

Poems are sometimes “tit for tat,” and rhythmic, bouncing back and forth or within beats, like he said this and she said that or kitty ka ka, kitty ka ka or blow, blow, blow! High, high, high!

Poems may be written in older languages or dialect, or rhyme eg. Dumlit, cumlit, bumlit!  or dummy, scummy, chummy, bummy!

Poems may be metered or versed or use specific syllabic sequences like 5-7-5 in Haiku

 

 

 

 

 

 

Up to Snuff: Back Cover

“Up to Snuff” was something said to Ms. Osei-Bonsu by a newspaper in Chicago as a rookie getting into journalism young.  What “Up to Snuff” came to be for her later was the design of a “ladder” in writing, to climb up and grow as a writer by teaching herself and to use that research to be a wise guide for other writers.  “The writing education I longed for did not exist yet,” so Ms. Osei-Bonsu became one of the pioneers of it.  The challenge was how do you really thoroughly teach a writer to be “wielding” and instill a deep talent for the field?  Up to Snuff came to be a column on the www.revolvingstream.com  blog/database that is planned for publication as a print edition text book for use in schools around the world.  The ultimate goal for the “Up to Snuff” column and book is to found “The Snuff School of Writing,” based on the research from the book.

Things discovered while compiling “Up to Snuff,” were that a writer needs lots of book lists; a writer needs to be well read and should develop a private library.  A writer needs “templates” for many different kinds of writing. A writer needs a good desk top reference book list.  A writer needs to study syntax.  A writer needs to know about conventionality in writing.  A writer needs to test their range.  A writer needs to use precise words.  A writer needs wisdom.  A writer, especially a writing teacher, should study in a variety of programs and even engage in interdisciplinary studies for a broader knowledge base from which to write. With Social Science or research based writing or “data rich” writing or academic writing are all very good ways of achieving sophisticated work.  Creative writing may benefit from tested techniques such as taking a sampling or writing non-stop.  A writer can plan as a basis for later books, crafting dynamic PHD’s or dissertation research or advanced studies to become an authority on a subject area.

Ms. Osei-Bonsu is studying in two interdisciplinary programs at Eastern Michigan University and at the Vermont Military School, Norwich University.   She studied design at Central Saint Martin’s College of Art And Design in London.  Ms. Osei-Bonsu has written for three newspapers including Afrique Newsmagazine where she was an arts columnist.  She received an Irene Little Wallace Award from the Dept. of English Literature at EMU.  She got started in writing with an informal audit of a personal essay class at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York where she was formerly on staff.   Ms. Osei-Bonsu is the author of two books of poetry including, “Magic 8 and the Bone Marrow Sucker,” and “The Pearl Reader,” which are available on www.trafford.com and www.amazon.com.

 

 

Just Released “The Pearl Reader” By Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

To order “The Pearl Reader” and “Magic 8 and The Bone Marrow Sucker,” two delightful collections of poems by Ghanaian-American poet, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu, see below links.  Available from the website, or the publisher on trafford.com or from Amazon.com or Chapters in Indigo in Canada and coming soon on Barnes and Noble online. Enter your contact information at www.magic8book.com to receive future notices about upcoming book releases.

Magic 8 & the Bone Marrow Sucker:

https://www.amazon.com/Magic-Bone-Marrow-Sucker-Collected/dp/1490766499/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500068880&sr=8-1&keywords=9781490766492

http://www.trafford.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-001047266

www.magic8book.com

In Canada:

https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-CA/home/search/?keywords=Afua%20Serwah%20Osei-Bonsu

The Pearl Reader:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1490783482/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500069192&sr=8-1&keywords=9781490783482

http://www.trafford.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-001049410

www.thepearlreader.com