Up to Snuff #120: Range

Up to Snuff #120:  Range

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Library keyword Search, creative writing, indicative of range:

  • Fiction family life
  • American Fiction
  • Young adult fiction
  • Critique
  • Collaboration
  • Screen Production
  • Creative Literary Translation
  • Interdisciplinary Research
  • Comparative Grammar
  • Autobiographical
  • Exploring Freedoms in writing
  • National Curriculum
  • Thematic Analysis
  • Storytelling
  • Research
  • Multilingual Writing
  • Creative Writing Theory
  • Critical Theory
  • Art, Literature, Ethics
  • Pedagogy
  • Detective Fiction
  • Church Liturgy
  • Expressive Writing
  • Modern Civilization
  • Print and Broadcast Journalism
  • Rhetorical Analysis
  • Transcription
  • Qualitative Research
  • Journal
  • Conversation Analysis
  • Social Impact
  • Literary Reviews
  • Literary Criticism
  • Short Fiction
  • History
  • Novelist
  • Narrative History
  • Editorial
  • Social Science Theories
  • Romance
  • Digital Writing
  • Evaluate
  • Educational Philosophy
  • Transdisciplinary
  • Professional Habitus
  • Emancipatory
  • Data Analysis
  • Neoliberalism
  • Newspaper
  • History & Criticism
  • Victorian Period
  • Research starters
  • Biographical
  • Woman Authors
  • Twentieth Century British Drama
  • Spanish Fiction
  • Spanish Drama
  • Short Fiction Late Nineteenth Century
  • Short Story
  • History Instruction
  • Literary History
  • Cultural History
  • Divergent Thinking
  • Cognitive Complexity
  • Educational Measurement
  • Social Skills
  • Theory Building
  • Path Analysis
  • Criterion Theory
  • Physical Models
  • Anthropology
  • Communication and Media Studies
  • International Relations
  • Public Policy
  • Social Policy
  • Social Work
  • Sociology

 

Up to Snuff #112: A solemn vow, to become a good communicator

Up to Snuff #112:  A solemn vow, to become a good communicator

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Becoming a good communicator may take a combination of strong technical writing, mixed with graphic design, copy editing and rhetoric.  One may have a goal and make a vow to themselves to be strong or masterful within an area like “communication” or type of writing skills like “content” or “technical” or “editing.” Technical writing is very useful in the workplace in memos or emails.  It is also good at creating excitement in workplace exchanges and documents.  Technical writing is strongly used for making textbooks, manuals and a variety of professional documents and even editorial writing. Communication then becomes something like style, delivery, organization, understanding, value and service, clarity. It is what it is; it is what you want yours to be.  It’s always beneficial to create “value” in a document and go the extra mile in an email for example and provide a precise link. Also, one key to technical communication has consistently been problem-solving.

The below list makes up the beginning of a quest for mastership in communication:

Technical Communication, 11th edition 2014
Mike Markel
ISBN: 978-0312-485979
Bedford/St. Martin’s

Technical and Professional Writing, Solving Problems at Work, By Kennedy & Montgomery

Business Writing, By Wilma Davidson

Excellence in Business Communication, Twelth Edition 2017
John V. Thill and Courtland L. Bovee
ISBN: 9780134388144
Pearson
Loose Leaf Edition: ISBN: 9780134388175

Successful Writing at Work, 4th Concise Edition 2014
Philip Kolin
ISBN: 978-1280-5052564
Cengage

Technical Communication Today, 5th Edition 2014
Richard Johnson-Sheehan
ISBN 978-0321-907981
Pearson

The Essentials of Technical Communication 3rd Edition 2014
Elizabeth Tebeaux and Sam Dragga
ISBN: 978-0195-5384222
Oxford University Press

Writing in the Health Professions 2005  Barbara A. Heifferon
ISBN: 978-0321-105271

Google Professional memos

Purdue Owl (search technical writing for examples of memo writing and workplace writing etc.)

Copy Editor’s Handbook:  A Guide to Book Publishing and Corporate Communication

Pay attention to stellar staff emails and memos in the workplace

Get a Technical Writing degree

Up to Snuff #65 Summer Booklist

Up to Snuff # 65 Summer Booklist

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Aesop’s Fables

Byron

John Bull

Lord David Cecil

The Bronte’s Web of Childhood

Ossian

Scott

1984

Bunyan

The Secret Life of the Renowned Storyteller

Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Richard Bach

Till we have faces,  CS Lewis

Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury

The Collected Poems Dylan Thomas

The Red Badge of Courage

Their Eyes Were Watching God

The Great Gatsby

A Passage to India

Maurice

Orlando, Virginia Wolf

Edith Wharton

Jane Austen

Evelyn Waugh

Pride and Prejudice

Bronte’s

Mary Shelly

Thomas Hardy

Girl with a Candle

Henry James

Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Clarice Lispector

War and Peace

Bleak House

Middle March

Vanity Fair

Moby-Dick

Mrs. Dalloway

The Tale of Genji

Ulysses

Zora Canon

Penguin Classics Asian American Masterpieces

Persephone books

Animal Acts, Una Chaudhuri

A World of Fiction,  Katherine Bode

The Last Lecture, Randy Pausch

The Good Earth, Pearl S. Buck

The Jungle, Upton Sinclair

Voltaire Philosophical Dictionary

Gone with the Wind, Margaret Mitchell

Alice in Wonderland, Lewis Carroll

The Everyday Writer, Andrea Lunsford

Up to Snuff #111: Periods in Literature

Up to Snuff #111:  Periods in Literature

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Period 1

Prehistoric Cultures, Mesopotamia, Egypt

Literature:  Psalm, Genesis I-II, Mesopotamian Paralellels, Enuma Elish, The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Patriarchs and The Exodus, Egyptian Monotheism, Conquest Chaos and Kingship, The Prophets, Amos, Hosea, The Book of Job, Isaiah, The Suffering Servant

Period 2

Classicism:  Greece and Rome

Literature:  The Homeric Epic (The Iliad, The Odyssey)

Literature of the Golden Age:  Greek Tragedy, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle

Literature: The Roman Epic (Virgil’s Aeneid)

Period 3

Classicism II:  The Renaissance

Sixteenth-Century Literature:   Machiavelli, Castiglione, Montaigne, Shakespeare’s Hamlet

Period 4

Classicism III:  17th and 18th Centuries

The Enlightenment

Seventeenth- Century Literature:  Moliere, Racine

Eighteenth- Century Literature:  Swift, Voltaire, Counterpoint to Rationalism

Period 5

The Celebration of Feeling, Romanticism

Literature:  Rousseau, Goethe, Wordsworth

Period 6

Christianity I

Literature:  The New Testament, St. Augustine

Period 7

Christianity II and The Middle Ages

Literature:  The Song of Roland, The Thirteenth-Century Synthesis, Dante, Chaucer

Period 8

Christianity III:  The Era of Reformation

Literature:  Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, The Counter of Reformation:  Loyola

Period 9

Realism and Materialism

Literature:  Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Dickinson

Period 10

Modernism 1

Literature:  Conrad, Kafka, Mann, Joyce, Eliot, Faulkner

Period 11

Modernism II

Modernism and Transcendent

Literature:  Camus, Beckett and the Theater of the Absurd, Wiesel, Solzhenitsyn, Sartre, Existentialism

Period 12

Post Modernism

Literature:  Beckett, Borges, Ionesco, Handke, Nabokov, Pinter, Robbe-Grillet, Barth, Burroughs, Coover, Doctorow, Marquez, Pynchon, Shepard

The above was extracted from “Art, Ideas and Civilization,” by Jack A. Hobbs and Robert L. Duncan published on Prentice Hall.  The book places in context art juxtaposed with literature and music as all were interrelated in their respective periods.  The book presents a framework for the historical emergence of literature that played a significant role within its time period.

Up to Snuff #110 More Fiction Notes

Up to Snuff #110:  More Fiction Notes

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Is the use of descriptions for manifestation in fiction writing an appropriate technique?

Is use of all descriptions the way of manifestation in fiction writing?

Are there other similar constructions like this use of all descriptions that could be utilized in creative writing for example?

Writing is a process of manifestation, therefore the use of all descriptions conjures, evokes, spiritualizes.

Show time.

What are qualities in fiction that make live? What are the make live qualities?

Actionable.

Make live?

Senses

Voice

Intelligence

Action

Within time

Has value

Changes

Grows

Develops

Lessons

Problem Solving

Insight, ingenuity, the ideas, the hook, then a story about how it plays out

Below every thought you carry with you that piece of ingenuity that insight

You develop a personal relationship, am I, which am I?  Joy or devastation?

  1. “Wuthering Heights” child of love, child of hate.

“The emotional playground” in fiction is the primary function in good fiction.

 

The Audience.  It’s for something or someone.  Are you placing it in a 12 year olds hands?

It has a greater purpose may be something like cultural branding

 

It’s higher purpose may be something like opposition to divorce

A personal relationship, one must place themselves within some aspect of the books context

They must admire, relate or connect

A personality development beyond relationship, it may refine one in some way.

Like a lead poem plants a context in the mind and sows the field

Like a book preface or introduction may plant a foreshadowing or romance for the writer within a different perspective

A book almost always needs to have gifts and generosity.  Gifts can be cultural gifts, personality trait gifts, but literature, in general, should have the quality of generosity.

 

Fiction may be a careful thread with cadence pulled from your various research and notes which are all writerly, smoothly laid not cut and paste or chopped or inserted, but written, revised, edited, slightly improved upon, refined and polished.  It should be precise.  Precision is an incredibly important word for a writer, as it impacts diction.

The most important thing you do is writing a plan, thumbnails, research sketches, all the variety of research you will need to build your story and education.

Your set may not be your key element, your key element may be your emotional playground.  It may be more integral to the book -your insights trump your furniture.  In the end the book lives in thoughts, it’s chiefly thoughts, it generates thoughts and has one most significant idea or insight.  Your key work will exist within this domain around thinking and thoughts, insights and ideas.

Children’s books are generally spoken, fiction novels live in thoughts or imagination etc. Where creative non-fiction may aspire or exist in learning or knowledge areas.

There is a great story in some fiction.  Some may be chiefly psychological, some may be chiefly storytelling, story after story.  Some fiction novels are travel writing or autobiographical.

One must find their own agenda for each book.  Some books are more imaginative, others are more emotional.

Software in the end will help with managing a large quantity of writing, organizing it, to edit it and in some cases design it.  Writers who utilize software may come out with more perfected versions. Writers may also design their software to create a variety of types of writing or use different software for different writing if one becomes unable.  You can get software for cover letters.

You do not want a program to write your books

Use of software as paramount to organization in fiction novels

Fiction books are the only ones that are novels.

You must make your own plan

Your own worksheet

Your own research

Your own emotional playground

You should not be me, or her or them, you must be yourself to be successful.

It is as it is; it is as you want it to be.

Up to Snuff #109: Fiction Outline

Up to Snuff #109:  Fiction Outline

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

Plot-Most basic idea

Who’s going to be in your book?

Setting:  Collecting a setting via sampling, writing non-stop, prototypes, sets, all descriptive content, sometimes poetic and sweetened

Most basic story

Craft Beginning, Middle, Ending

Thread Story-Chronology, outline, Ven Diagram

All descriptions, describe setting, characters, emotions, dialog, activities, precise meaningful rich descriptions manifest story

Build Characters-Ven Diagram, descriptive sketches, emotional and physical attributes, research, emotional research, characteristics that bond reader to character, should be genuine not overly stereotypical, person/place/thing

Dialog-Playwrite, Q&A, tape recorder, software, claim claim warrant, dialog research and gridding, say in beginning,  introductions, said in middle, final resolving and closing commentary,  said to teach, express, make richer, describe, quality of dialog, purpose of dialog, how characters become wiser or more loved

Notes:

Suggestions, change over time, hair change, career change, graduate, meaningful events, relevant occurrences

The Conflict

Strong beginning to grab

History to word, language studies, foreign words

Introducing ideas, thoughts, making choices

Questions, lessons, proverbs, teachings, generosity, context, news, historical relationship

Climax, eureka, wisdom offering, cultural offering

Page turner, clean thread, build up, resolution, problem solving, smooth, suspenseful, wanting more action or wanting more knowledge of something, greed or hunger for more, embroiled in storytelling, swept away, transported, able to leave one’s life, immersed, delightful, generous quality, entertained or enlightened

Develops ones personality, cultural branding, offers one an attribute which they may emulate

HISS (highlight, spotlight, showcase)

  1. Lessons, Proverb, Theatrical & Scenic or Scenario (LPTS or Liptis) (a type of lens choice)
  2. Calling era, era planned themes
  3. High Life Sensation
  4. Rehearsal
  5. Staging
  6. Classicism
  7. Claim to fame
  8. Quepine, QPN, Question/ Proverb/ News
  9. News and Fantasy
  10. Voyeurism

History notes:

Looking through historical lens such as: social, economic, socioeconomic, cultural, military, religion, political, history of science

Events and individuals of the past

Change, context, causality, contingency, complexity

Primary and secondary sources, evidence, audience, write a thesis question to work from, relevance, intent, accuracy, authority, suffrage, religion, purpose, objective, summary, short responses, consequences, movements,  proximate, necessary, contributory, analysis, constitutional, longitudinal, messages, de jure, de facto, credibility, abstract, transitional language, class relation, social phenomena, brief description, Boolean operators, major concepts, identify keywords, ephemera, posters, postcards, advertisements, change, historical event analysis, plan, critical research question, historical thinking applies, subjectivity

Historical significance:  1) How notable or important was the event at the time it occurred? 2) Did the event affect a great many people? 3) Were the consequences of the event extensive or enduring 4) Does the event symbolize or relate to broader historical trends?

Historical evidence: documents, artifacts, buildings, paintings, photographs, oral histories,

Not evidence: opinion, rumor, propaganda, political rhetoric, historical narratives

What would you like to know more about?

  1. Historical event description
  2. Secondary sources
  3. Primary sources
  4. Research question
  5. Audience
  6. Message tailored to audience
  7. Articulation of response

Who are, where from, goals?

Change over time

Oracle Lab software

Up to Snuff #108: How to write the time

Up to Snuff #108: How to write the time

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

The time a.m. and p.m. stands for “ante meridiem” and “post meridiem.”

They should be written:

7:22 a.m.  and 10:00 p.m.  (lowercase, two periods and space)

Find lots of details about style and convention in the “Chicago Manual of Style.”

University of Chicago Press

Up to Snuff #107: Three Points

Up to Snuff #107:  Three Points

By, Afua Serwah Osei-Bonsu

  • “Writing should be accurate, clear, informative and concise.” (Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)
  • “Writing should be authoritative.” (Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

The word “author” may be derived from authoritative.  Authoritative is described as “having or preceding from authority and clearly accurate or knowledgeable.”  (Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

  • “Carefully observe your words.” “Carefully observe” is something that each would-be writer should hear through their virgin ears, to line up their words at the “juncture” for careful scrutiny.

Up to Snuff #105 Historical Writing

Up to Snuff #105 Historical Writing

A place in history

Making a historical art work:

Looking through historical lens such as: social, economic, socioeconomic, cultural, military, religion, political, history of science

Events and individuals of the past

Change, context, causality, contingency, complexity

Primary and secondary sources, evidence, audience, write a thesis question to work from, relevance, intent, accuracy, authority, suffrage, religion, purpose, objective, summary, short responses, consequences, movements,  proximate, necessary, contributory, analysis, constitutional, longitudinal, messages, de jure, de facto, credibility, abstract, transitional language, class relation, social phenomena, brief description, Boolean operators, major concepts, identify keywords, ephemera, posters, postcards, advertisements, change, historical event analysis, plan, critical research question, historical thinking applies, subjectivity

Historical significance:  1) How notable or important was the event at the time it occurred? 2) Did the event affect a great many people? 3) Were the consequences of the event extensive or enduring 4) Does the event symbolize or relate to broader historical trends?

Historical evidence: documents, artifacts, buildings, paintings, photographs, oral histories,

Not evidence: opinion, rumor, propaganda, political rhetoric, historical narratives

What would you like to know more about?

  1. Historical event description
  2. Secondary sources
  3. Primary sources
  4. Research question
  5. Audience
  6. Message tailored to audience
  7. Articulation of response

Who are, where from, goals?

Change over time